Data Shropshire

Areas without Coronavirus spread (17th July update)

2020.07.17 18:16 _c9s_ Areas without Coronavirus spread (17th July update)

Here's an update to the post I made last week looking at the end of the spectrum we're not talking about so much - where we're not seeing many cases of Coronavirus spreading in the UK.
Orkney and the Western Isles are the only areas that haven't seen any cases in the past month now, with the other areas that were getting close last week mostly having a low number of cases crop up over the week.

Here's a big table of the date of the latest case reported in each local authority/health board, and how many cases they've had in the past two weeks:
Latest reported case Local authority/health board Cases 3 July to 17 Jul
2020-06-15 Orkney 0
2020-06-15 Western Isles 0
2020-06-18 North Devon 0
2020-06-21 Borders 0
2020-06-26 Barrow-in-Furness 0
2020-06-26 Great Yarmouth 0
2020-06-26 West Devon 0
2020-06-27 Torfaen 0
2020-07-01 Mendip 0
2020-07-03 Mid Suffolk 1
2020-07-03 Scarborough 1
2020-07-03 Wyre Forest 1
2020-07-04 Breckland 2
2020-07-04 Stevenage 2
2020-07-05 Forest of Dean 2
2020-07-05 Ryedale 2
2020-07-06 Copeland 4
2020-07-06 Tewkesbury 3
2020-07-07 Caerphilly 6
2020-07-07 Ceredigion 4
2020-07-07 Cotswold 2
2020-07-07 Hastings 1
2020-07-07 Maldon 1
2020-07-07 Mid Ulster -4
2020-07-07 Richmond upon Thames 3
2020-07-08 Cambridge 6
2020-07-08 Harlow 2
2020-07-08 North Hertfordshire 4
2020-07-08 South Norfolk 1
2020-07-08 South Somerset 1
2020-07-09 Adur 3
2020-07-09 Bath and North East Somerset 2
2020-07-09 Blaenau Gwent 4
2020-07-09 Cannock Chase 15
2020-07-09 Gosport 5
2020-07-09 Hart 3
2020-07-09 Isle of Wight 1
2020-07-09 King's Lynn and West Norfolk 1
2020-07-09 Malvern Hills 5
2020-07-09 Melton 8
2020-07-09 Mole Valley 1
2020-07-09 North East Derbyshire 1
2020-07-09 North Lincolnshire 7
2020-07-09 Ribble Valley 7
2020-07-09 Runnymede 7
2020-07-09 Rushmoor 1
2020-07-09 Sedgemoor 4
2020-07-09 South Kesteven 6
2020-07-09 Stratford-on-Avon 8
2020-07-09 Stroud 1
2020-07-09 Tandridge 5
2020-07-09 Torridge 3
2020-07-10 Amber Valley 7
2020-07-10 Bridgend 6
2020-07-10 Chiltern 5
2020-07-10 Dorset 8
2020-07-10 Elmbridge 9
2020-07-10 Halton 6
2020-07-10 Lisburn and Castlereagh 5
2020-07-10 Mid Devon 2
2020-07-10 New Forest 2
2020-07-10 Newport 3
2020-07-10 North Norfolk 1
2020-07-10 North Somerset 4
2020-07-10 South Staffordshire 3
2020-07-10 Southampton 18
2020-07-10 Three Rivers 7
2020-07-10 Winchester 2
2020-07-11 Crawley 8
2020-07-11 Croydon 14
2020-07-11 Dumfries and Galloway 7
2020-07-11 East Hampshire 2
2020-07-11 East Riding of Yorkshire 11
2020-07-11 Highland 2
2020-07-11 Northumberland 9
2020-07-11 Rutland 3
2020-07-11 Tendring 5
2020-07-11 Test Valley 5
2020-07-11 Wokingham 12
2020-07-12 Blackpool 15
2020-07-12 Bromsgrove 4
2020-07-12 Castle Point 8
2020-07-12 Exeter 5
2020-07-12 Harborough 17
2020-07-12 Horsham 5
2020-07-12 Ipswich 6
2020-07-12 Milton Keynes 10
2020-07-12 Newcastle upon Tyne 12
2020-07-12 Rother 8
2020-07-12 Staffordshire Moorlands 6
2020-07-12 Tamworth 6
2020-07-12 Thurrock 13
2020-07-13 Aylesbury Vale 18
2020-07-13 Babergh 1
2020-07-13 Bolsover 2
2020-07-13 Brentwood 9
2020-07-13 Broxtowe 6
2020-07-13 Chorley 3
2020-07-13 Craven 3
2020-07-13 Denbighshire 8
2020-07-13 East Cambridgeshire 1
2020-07-13 East Hertfordshire 4
2020-07-13 Eastleigh 3
2020-07-13 Epping Forest 4
2020-07-13 Fareham 9
2020-07-13 Guildford 4
2020-07-13 Hammersmith and Fulham 8
2020-07-13 Harrogate 11
2020-07-13 Islington 10
2020-07-13 Knowsley 9
2020-07-13 Lancaster 4
2020-07-13 Maidstone 5
2020-07-13 Merthyr Tydfil 5
2020-07-13 Merton 8
2020-07-13 Monmouthshire 3
2020-07-13 North West Leicestershire 15
2020-07-13 Norwich 6
2020-07-13 Pembrokeshire 4
2020-07-13 Plymouth 7
2020-07-13 Reigate and Banstead 5
2020-07-13 Rhondda Cynon Taf 18
2020-07-13 Shropshire 19
2020-07-13 Solihull 20
2020-07-13 Somerset West and Taunton 4
2020-07-13 South Derbyshire 5
2020-07-13 South Lakeland 2
2020-07-13 South Oxfordshire 11
2020-07-13 South Tyneside 7
2020-07-13 Spelthorne 4
2020-07-13 St. Helens 6
2020-07-13 Sunderland 12
2020-07-13 Teignbridge 5
2020-07-13 Tower Hamlets 28
2020-07-13 Tunbridge Wells 19
2020-07-13 Uttlesford 2
2020-07-13 Vale of White Horse 8
2020-07-13 Warwick 3
2020-07-13 Wellingborough 9
2020-07-13 West Oxfordshire 6
2020-07-13 West Suffolk 6
2020-07-13 Westminster 14
2020-07-13 Woking 16
2020-07-13 Worthing 8
2020-07-14 Arun 4
2020-07-14 Ashfield 8
2020-07-14 Ashford 35
2020-07-14 Basingstoke and Deane 3
2020-07-14 Bassetlaw 14
2020-07-14 Bedford 30
2020-07-14 Bexley 20
2020-07-14 Bracknell Forest 6
2020-07-14 Braintree 54
2020-07-14 Carmarthenshire 7
2020-07-14 Central Bedfordshire 28
2020-07-14 Chelmsford 9
2020-07-14 Cheltenham 4
2020-07-14 Cherwell 5
2020-07-14 Chesterfield 9
2020-07-14 Colchester 7
2020-07-14 Conwy 16
2020-07-14 Cornwall 12
2020-07-14 Darlington 4
2020-07-14 Derbyshire Dales 2
2020-07-14 Dover 21
2020-07-14 East Devon 6
2020-07-14 East Suffolk 7
2020-07-14 Enfield 16
2020-07-14 Fenland 14
2020-07-14 Gateshead 9
2020-07-14 Gedling 5
2020-07-14 Gravesham 17
2020-07-14 Hambleton 2
2020-07-14 Havant 3
2020-07-14 Hertsmere 6
2020-07-14 Isle of Anglesey 8
2020-07-14 Kingston upon Thames 9
2020-07-14 Mid Sussex 6
2020-07-14 Newark and Sherwood 7
2020-07-14 North Tyneside 7
2020-07-14 North Warwickshire 3
2020-07-14 Oxford 21
2020-07-14 Portsmouth 9
2020-07-14 Powys 7
2020-07-14 Redcar and Cleveland 4
2020-07-14 Redditch 2
2020-07-14 Richmondshire 2
2020-07-14 Rushcliffe 10
2020-07-14 Selby 6
2020-07-14 Sevenoaks 11
2020-07-14 South Hams 1
2020-07-14 South Ribble 10
2020-07-14 Southend-on-Sea 23
2020-07-14 Southwark 16
2020-07-14 Stafford 9
2020-07-14 Stockton-on-Tees 11
2020-07-14 Stoke-on-Trent 39
2020-07-14 Sutton 12
2020-07-14 Swale 10
2020-07-14 Vale of Glamorgan 11
2020-07-14 Wealden 16
2020-07-14 West Berkshire 6
2020-07-14 Wiltshire 18
2020-07-14 Wirral 22
2020-07-14 York 11
2020-07-15 Allerdale 4
2020-07-15 Ards and North Down 0
2020-07-15 Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon -2
2020-07-15 Barking and Dagenham 10
2020-07-15 Barnet 34
2020-07-15 Barnsley 45
2020-07-15 Basildon 24
2020-07-15 Boston 2
2020-07-15 Bournemouth Christchurch and Poole 11
2020-07-15 Brent 20
2020-07-15 Brighton and Hove 14
2020-07-15 Bristol City of 15
2020-07-15 Bromley 12
2020-07-15 Camden 8
2020-07-15 Canterbury 22
2020-07-15 Cardiff 14
2020-07-15 Carlisle 38
2020-07-15 Charnwood 33
2020-07-15 Cheshire West and Chester 57
2020-07-15 Chichester 4
2020-07-15 Corby 11
2020-07-15 Dacorum 15
2020-07-15 Dartford 28
2020-07-15 Daventry 8
2020-07-15 Derby 35
2020-07-15 Doncaster 49
2020-07-15 Dudley 13
2020-07-15 Ealing 19
2020-07-15 East Lindsey 8
2020-07-15 East Northamptonshire 21
2020-07-15 East Staffordshire 43
2020-07-15 Eastbourne 32
2020-07-15 Epsom and Ewell 7
2020-07-15 Erewash 6
2020-07-15 Flintshire 19
2020-07-15 Folkestone and Hythe 19
2020-07-15 Fylde 15
2020-07-15 Gloucester 4
2020-07-15 Greenwich 14
2020-07-15 Gwynedd 14
2020-07-15 Hackney 47
2020-07-15 Haringey 23
2020-07-15 Harrow 22
2020-07-15 Hartlepool 3
2020-07-15 Herefordshire County of 116
2020-07-15 High Peak 7
2020-07-15 Hillingdon 27
2020-07-15 Hinckley and Bosworth 10
2020-07-15 Hounslow 20
2020-07-15 Hyndburn 11
2020-07-15 Kensington and Chelsea 7
2020-07-15 Kettering 44
2020-07-15 Kingston upon Hull City of 10
2020-07-15 Lambeth 19
2020-07-15 Leeds 107
2020-07-15 Lewes 9
2020-07-15 Lichfield 9
2020-07-15 Liverpool 44
2020-07-15 Mansfield 1
2020-07-15 Medway 23
2020-07-15 Middlesbrough 8
2020-07-15 Neath Port Talbot 10
2020-07-15 Newcastle-under-Lyme 12
2020-07-15 Newham 24
2020-07-15 Nottingham 23
2020-07-15 Nuneaton and Bedworth 24
2020-07-15 Oadby and Wigston 33
2020-07-15 Pendle 87
2020-07-15 Peterborough 99
2020-07-15 Preston 19
2020-07-15 Reading 11
2020-07-15 Redbridge 25
2020-07-15 Rochdale 148
2020-07-15 Rochford 8
2020-07-15 Rossendale 5
2020-07-15 Rotherham 86
2020-07-15 Salford 52
2020-07-15 Sandwell 58
2020-07-15 Sheffield 124
2020-07-15 Slough 17
2020-07-15 South Bucks 3
2020-07-15 South Cambridgeshire 11
2020-07-15 South Gloucestershire 6
2020-07-15 South Holland 13
2020-07-15 St Albans 32
2020-07-15 Stockport 25
2020-07-15 Surrey Heath 5
2020-07-15 Swansea 12
2020-07-15 Tameside 32
2020-07-15 Telford and Wrekin 19
2020-07-15 Thanet 34
2020-07-15 Tonbridge and Malling 3
2020-07-15 Torbay 4
2020-07-15 Trafford 30
2020-07-15 Wakefield 131
2020-07-15 Waltham Forest 19
2020-07-15 Wandsworth 26
2020-07-15 Warrington 12
2020-07-15 Waverley 4
2020-07-15 Welwyn Hatfield 11
2020-07-15 West Lancashire 9
2020-07-15 Wigan 27
2020-07-15 Windsor and Maidenhead 11
2020-07-15 Wolverhampton 17
2020-07-15 Worcester 6
2020-07-15 Wychavon 9
2020-07-15 Wycombe 12
2020-07-15 Wyre 7
2020-07-16 Birmingham 160
2020-07-16 Blaby 31
2020-07-16 Blackburn with Darwen 139
2020-07-16 Bolton 84
2020-07-16 Bradford 373
2020-07-16 Broadland 4
2020-07-16 Broxbourne 9
2020-07-16 Burnley 14
2020-07-16 Bury 24
2020-07-16 Calderdale 74
2020-07-16 Cheshire East 32
2020-07-16 County Durham 25
2020-07-16 Coventry 27
2020-07-16 Eden 11
2020-07-16 Fermanagh and Omagh 2
2020-07-16 Havering 21
2020-07-16 Huntingdonshire 8
2020-07-16 Kirklees 237
2020-07-16 Leicester 679
2020-07-16 Lewisham 15
2020-07-16 Lincoln 7
2020-07-16 Luton 89
2020-07-16 Manchester 135
2020-07-16 Newry, Mourne and Down 15
2020-07-16 North East Lincolnshire 5
2020-07-16 North Kesteven 7
2020-07-16 Northampton 91
2020-07-16 Oldham 66
2020-07-16 Rugby 15
2020-07-16 Sefton 34
2020-07-16 South Northamptonshire 9
2020-07-16 Swindon 21
2020-07-16 Walsall 46
2020-07-16 Watford 4
2020-07-16 West Lindsey 10
2020-07-16 Wrexham 51
2020-07-17 Antrim and Newtownabbey -2
2020-07-17 Ayrshire and Arran 7
2020-07-17 Belfast 11
2020-07-17 Causeway Coast and Glens 19
2020-07-17 Derry City and Strabane 12
2020-07-17 Fife 7
2020-07-17 Forth Valley 21
2020-07-17 Grampian 10
2020-07-17 Greater Glasgow and Clyde 39
2020-07-17 Lanarkshire 17
2020-07-17 Lothian 18
2020-07-17 Mid and East Antrim 7
2020-07-17 Tayside 9

Notes for Scotland

Scotland reports data based on local health boards rather than local authorities and with the date they were reported rather than the date the swab was taken. This will result in higher numbers than elsewhere and the latest cases being slightly more recent than the rest of the UK.

Notes for NI

Some parts of NI are reporting negative cases, which is mathematically impossible. I believe is due to the authorities reporting data incorrectly and then correcting it later without updating the historical data.

Data sources

submitted by _c9s_ to CoronavirusUK [link] [comments]


2020.07.09 18:44 _c9s_ Areas where Coronavirus isn't spreading

With lots of talk about the places where cases are spiking, I thought it might be interesting to look at the other end of the spectrum - where we're not seeing any cases reported.
Below is a list of all the Local Authorities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and health boards in Scotland, the date of their most recent case, and the number of cases in the past two weeks. Sorry for the length of this post!

Derry City and Strabane is the only part of the UK that haven't seen a case in over a month, with Uttlesford (in Essex), the Scottish isles (Orkney, Western Isles), and parts of the South West (Bath, North Devon) only slightly behind with no cases in the past 3 weeks.
Living in one of those areas, it does make me quite a bit less hesitant to do things like go to the pub, since there's such a low chance of catching it.

Latest reported case Local authority/health board Cases 25th June to 9th July
2020-06-04 Derry City and Strabane 0
2020-06-13 Uttlesford 0
2020-06-15 Bath and North East Somerset 0
2020-06-15 Orkney 0
2020-06-15 Western Isles 0
2020-06-18 North Devon 0
2020-06-20 Exeter 0
2020-06-20 Havant 0
2020-06-20 Maldon 0
2020-06-21 Borders -1
2020-06-22 Rossendale 0
2020-06-23 South Hams 0
2020-06-24 Babergh 0
2020-06-24 Monmouthshire 0
2020-06-25 Arun 1
2020-06-25 Causeway Coast and Glens 4
2020-06-26 Barrow-in-Furness 1
2020-06-26 Great Yarmouth 1
2020-06-26 Rushmoor 2
2020-06-26 South Staffordshire 3
2020-06-26 West Devon 1
2020-06-27 Somerset West and Taunton 1
2020-06-27 Torfaen 1
2020-06-28 South Somerset 2
2020-06-29 Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon -10
2020-06-29 Cotswold 1
2020-06-29 Darlington 1
2020-06-29 Eastleigh 2
2020-06-29 Epping Forest 4
2020-06-29 Hastings 2
2020-06-29 King's Lynn and West Norfolk 3
2020-06-29 Mansfield 2
2020-06-29 Powys 2
2020-06-29 Stroud 1
2020-06-29 Winchester 1
2020-06-30 Bolsover 9
2020-06-30 Bromsgrove 11
2020-06-30 East Hampshire 4
2020-06-30 Hambleton 1
2020-06-30 South Bucks 2
2020-06-30 Worthing 3
2020-07-01 Ards and North Down 7
2020-07-01 Mendip 3
2020-07-01 Merthyr Tydfil 109
2020-07-01 Mole Valley 4
2020-07-01 North Somerset 8
2020-07-01 Reading 9
2020-07-01 Richmondshire 3
2020-07-01 Torridge 2
2020-07-02 Basingstoke and Deane 3
2020-07-02 Brighton and Hove 11
2020-07-02 Chorley 6
2020-07-02 East Cambridgeshire 3
2020-07-02 Guildford 6
2020-07-02 Hartlepool 2
2020-07-02 Isle of Wight 3
2020-07-02 New Forest 2
2020-07-02 North East Derbyshire 12
2020-07-02 Richmond upon Thames 5
2020-07-02 South Lakeland 4
2020-07-02 South Norfolk 4
2020-07-02 Sutton 4
2020-07-03 Adur 3
2020-07-03 Broadland 3
2020-07-03 Ceredigion 2
2020-07-03 Cherwell 16
2020-07-03 Craven 4
2020-07-03 Daventry 9
2020-07-03 Denbighshire 8
2020-07-03 Fermanagh and Omagh 2
2020-07-03 Fife 4
2020-07-03 Horsham 6
2020-07-03 Lewes 8
2020-07-03 Lichfield 6
2020-07-03 Mid Suffolk 2
2020-07-03 Newark and Sherwood 3
2020-07-03 North Warwickshire 8
2020-07-03 Norwich 4
2020-07-03 Redcar and Cleveland 5
2020-07-03 Runnymede 4
2020-07-03 Scarborough 1
2020-07-03 Sedgemoor 8
2020-07-03 Spelthorne 8
2020-07-03 Tonbridge and Malling 3
2020-07-03 Tunbridge Wells 9
2020-07-03 Warwick 2
2020-07-03 West Oxfordshire 2
2020-07-03 Wyre Forest 2
2020-07-04 Ashfield 11
2020-07-04 Boston 7
2020-07-04 Breckland 3
2020-07-04 Castle Point 13
2020-07-04 Colchester 13
2020-07-04 Derbyshire Dales 8
2020-07-04 Harlow 3
2020-07-04 Hart 2
2020-07-04 Hinckley and Bosworth 22
2020-07-04 North Norfolk 3
2020-07-04 Redditch 3
2020-07-04 Rochford 8
2020-07-04 Southend-on-Sea 20
2020-07-04 Stevenage 3
2020-07-04 Sunderland 5
2020-07-04 Teignbridge 2
2020-07-04 Waverley 3
2020-07-04 West Suffolk 11
2020-07-05 Ayrshire and Arran 6
2020-07-05 Basildon 16
2020-07-05 Braintree 8
2020-07-05 Canterbury 14
2020-07-05 Carmarthenshire 18
2020-07-05 Ealing 27
2020-07-05 East Lindsey 8
2020-07-05 Folkestone and Hythe 41
2020-07-05 Forest of Dean 2
2020-07-05 Halton 11
2020-07-05 Hammersmith and Fulham 17
2020-07-05 Highland 2
2020-07-05 Huntingdonshire 13
2020-07-05 Lancaster 3
2020-07-05 Luton 48
2020-07-05 Newham 25
2020-07-05 North East Lincolnshire 4
2020-07-05 North Hertfordshire 3
2020-07-05 Oxford 22
2020-07-05 Ribble Valley 9
2020-07-05 Rutland 3
2020-07-05 Ryedale 3
2020-07-05 Selby 7
2020-07-05 Slough 21
2020-07-05 South Gloucestershire 6
2020-07-05 South Kesteven 8
2020-07-05 Surrey Heath 6
2020-07-05 Swale 10
2020-07-05 Swansea 5
2020-07-05 Tandridge 7
2020-07-05 Tayside 8
2020-07-05 Torbay 6
2020-07-05 Warrington 13
2020-07-05 Wealden 16
2020-07-05 Wellingborough 9
2020-07-05 West Lindsey 3
2020-07-05 Wyre 8
2020-07-06 Allerdale 5
2020-07-06 Barnet 18
2020-07-06 Bassetlaw 20
2020-07-06 Blaenau Gwent 6
2020-07-06 Bournemouth Christchurch and Poole 7
2020-07-06 Brentwood 6
2020-07-06 Bridgend 4
2020-07-06 Broxbourne 1
2020-07-06 Broxtowe 8
2020-07-06 Burnley 13
2020-07-06 Bury 28
2020-07-06 Caerphilly 6
2020-07-06 Camden 5
2020-07-06 Cardiff 27
2020-07-06 Central Bedfordshire 24
2020-07-06 Chelmsford 15
2020-07-06 Chiltern 3
2020-07-06 Copeland 6
2020-07-06 Corby 1
2020-07-06 Dacorum 9
2020-07-06 Dover 28
2020-07-06 East Devon 7
2020-07-06 East Hertfordshire 6
2020-07-06 East Riding of Yorkshire 21
2020-07-06 East Suffolk 7
2020-07-06 Eden 1
2020-07-06 Fareham 4
2020-07-06 Fenland 9
2020-07-06 Gedling 5
2020-07-06 Greenwich 10
2020-07-06 Gwynedd 11
2020-07-06 Harrogate 13
2020-07-06 Islington 10
2020-07-06 Kensington and Chelsea 4
2020-07-06 Kingston upon Hull City of 15
2020-07-06 Knowsley 36
2020-07-06 Lambeth 11
2020-07-06 Lanarkshire 16
2020-07-06 Lincoln 7
2020-07-06 Maidstone 13
2020-07-06 Merton 12
2020-07-06 Mid Devon 1
2020-07-06 Middlesbrough 9
2020-07-06 North Kesteven 6
2020-07-06 Northumberland 16
2020-07-06 Plymouth 10
2020-07-06 Portsmouth 5
2020-07-06 Preston 29
2020-07-06 Reigate and Banstead 5
2020-07-06 Rhondda Cynon Taf 18
2020-07-06 Rugby 12
2020-07-06 Rushcliffe 8
2020-07-06 Shropshire 41
2020-07-06 South Cambridgeshire 5
2020-07-06 South Derbyshire 6
2020-07-06 South Holland 10
2020-07-06 Southampton 16
2020-07-06 St. Helens 14
2020-07-06 Stafford 16
2020-07-06 Staffordshire Moorlands 20
2020-07-06 Swindon 18
2020-07-06 Tendring 6
2020-07-06 Tewkesbury 8
2020-07-06 Thanet 28
2020-07-06 Three Rivers 10
2020-07-06 Thurrock 10
2020-07-06 Trafford 21
2020-07-06 Vale of Glamorgan 13
2020-07-06 Vale of White Horse 5
2020-07-06 Wandsworth 18
2020-07-06 Watford 9
2020-07-06 West Berkshire 4
2020-07-06 Wirral 24
2020-07-06 Wokingham 8
2020-07-06 Wrexham 72
2020-07-06 Wycombe 19
2020-07-06 York 11
2020-07-07 Amber Valley 9
2020-07-07 Antrim and Newtownabbey 0
2020-07-07 Ashford 56
2020-07-07 Aylesbury Vale 26
2020-07-07 Barking and Dagenham 13
2020-07-07 Barnsley 104
2020-07-07 Bexley 17
2020-07-07 Birmingham 114
2020-07-07 Blaby 35
2020-07-07 Blackburn with Darwen 71
2020-07-07 Bolton 90
2020-07-07 Bracknell Forest 6
2020-07-07 Brent 25
2020-07-07 Bristol City of 15
2020-07-07 Bromley 10
2020-07-07 Calderdale 55
2020-07-07 Cambridge 7
2020-07-07 Cannock Chase 19
2020-07-07 Carlisle 40
2020-07-07 Charnwood 48
2020-07-07 Cheltenham 7
2020-07-07 Cheshire East 49
2020-07-07 Cheshire West and Chester 65
2020-07-07 Chesterfield 7
2020-07-07 Chichester 2
2020-07-07 Conwy 16
2020-07-07 Cornwall 14
2020-07-07 County Durham 26
2020-07-07 Coventry 19
2020-07-07 Crawley 20
2020-07-07 Dartford 25
2020-07-07 Doncaster 66
2020-07-07 Dorset 7
2020-07-07 Dudley 15
2020-07-07 East Northamptonshire 21
2020-07-07 East Staffordshire 24
2020-07-07 Eastbourne 24
2020-07-07 Elmbridge 6
2020-07-07 Enfield 20
2020-07-07 Epsom and Ewell 5
2020-07-07 Flintshire 12
2020-07-07 Fylde 14
2020-07-07 Gateshead 6
2020-07-07 Gloucester 4
2020-07-07 Gosport 4
2020-07-07 Gravesham 15
2020-07-07 Hackney 22
2020-07-07 Harborough 25
2020-07-07 Haringey 12
2020-07-07 Harrow 15
2020-07-07 Havering 17
2020-07-07 Hertsmere 3
2020-07-07 High Peak 7
2020-07-07 Hillingdon 35
2020-07-07 Hounslow 27
2020-07-07 Hyndburn 3
2020-07-07 Ipswich 7
2020-07-07 Isle of Anglesey 9
2020-07-07 Kettering 26
2020-07-07 Kingston upon Thames 9
2020-07-07 Leeds 107
2020-07-07 Liverpool 76
2020-07-07 Malvern Hills 8
2020-07-07 Medway 26
2020-07-07 Melton 9
2020-07-07 Mid Sussex 4
2020-07-07 Mid Ulster -3
2020-07-07 Neath Port Talbot 6
2020-07-07 Newcastle upon Tyne 11
2020-07-07 Newcastle-under-Lyme 25
2020-07-07 Newport 5
2020-07-07 North Lincolnshire 11
2020-07-07 North Tyneside 4
2020-07-07 North West Leicestershire 19
2020-07-07 Northampton 66
2020-07-07 Nottingham 36
2020-07-07 Nuneaton and Bedworth 28
2020-07-07 Oadby and Wigston 34
2020-07-07 Pembrokeshire 2
2020-07-07 Pendle 51
2020-07-07 Redbridge 25
2020-07-07 Rochdale 147
2020-07-07 Rotherham 111
2020-07-07 Salford 38
2020-07-07 Sandwell 27
2020-07-07 Sefton 23
2020-07-07 Sheffield 201
2020-07-07 Solihull 13
2020-07-07 South Northamptonshire 9
2020-07-07 South Oxfordshire 10
2020-07-07 South Ribble 17
2020-07-07 Southwark 19
2020-07-07 Stockport 35
2020-07-07 Stockton-on-Tees 21
2020-07-07 Stratford-on-Avon 9
2020-07-07 Tameside 49
2020-07-07 Tamworth 10
2020-07-07 Telford and Wrekin 17
2020-07-07 Test Valley 3
2020-07-07 Wakefield 77
2020-07-07 Walsall 19
2020-07-07 Waltham Forest 23
2020-07-07 West Lancashire 13
2020-07-07 Westminster 9
2020-07-07 Wigan 21
2020-07-07 Wiltshire 17
2020-07-07 Windsor and Maidenhead 4
2020-07-07 Wolverhampton 27
2020-07-07 Worcester 9
2020-07-07 Wychavon 5
2020-07-08 Bedford 55
2020-07-08 Belfast 10
2020-07-08 Blackpool 24
2020-07-08 Bradford 389
2020-07-08 Croydon 15
2020-07-08 Derby 41
2020-07-08 Erewash 16
2020-07-08 Grampian 14
2020-07-08 Herefordshire County of 13
2020-07-08 Kirklees 248
2020-07-08 Leicester 804
2020-07-08 Lewisham 7
2020-07-08 Lisburn and Castlereagh 13
2020-07-08 Manchester 147
2020-07-08 Mid and East Antrim 12
2020-07-08 Milton Keynes 12
2020-07-08 Oldham 99
2020-07-08 Peterborough 75
2020-07-08 Rother 9
2020-07-08 Sevenoaks 14
2020-07-08 South Tyneside 4
2020-07-08 St Albans 40
2020-07-08 Stoke-on-Trent 53
2020-07-08 Tower Hamlets 22
2020-07-08 Welwyn Hatfield 10
2020-07-08 Woking 21
2020-07-09 Dumfries and Galloway 11
2020-07-09 Forth Valley 24
2020-07-09 Greater Glasgow and Clyde 31
2020-07-09 Lothian 9
2020-07-09 Newry, Mourne and Down 19

Notes for Scotland

Scotland reports data based on local health boards rather than local authorities and with the date they were reported rather than the date the swab was taken. This will result in higher numbers than elsewhere and the latest cases being slightly more recent than the rest of the UK.

Notes for NI

Some parts of NI (and also Scotland) are reporting negative cases, which is mathematically impossible. I believe is due to the authorities reporting data incorrectly and then correcting it later without updating the historical data. In Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon, as an example, there had been 754 confirmed cases on the 25th of June, which has dropped in several stages to 744 today.

Data sources

Edit: Welsh data was missing. I've added it now!
submitted by _c9s_ to CoronavirusUK [link] [comments]


2020.02.22 06:19 Enter_Laughing Best value areas to live for English Local Authority Districts (in terms of Median house prices & levels of deprivation)

For 317 Local Authority Districts in England, I've produced a table of the best value LSOA for each taking into account the level of deprivation and median house prices.
This gives each of 32,844 LSOAs (Lower Layer Super Output Area) used in the "English indices of deprivation 2019" a score based on the inverse of their rank (a higher Deprivation Score is better), and each LSOA a score based on their relative rank in terms of their median house price value (a higher House Price Score is better), then multiplies the two together to give an Overall Score.
The LSOA code will be meaningless to everybody, but it refers to a specific geographical area that typically has a population of around 1500 people (no more than 10,000).
Arguably a big flaw is that the scores do not scale in proportion to their significance.
I've included a link to the full spreadsheet with all 32,844 LSOAs (4MBs in size) here: http://www.filedropper.com/lsoasranked
Note there are 803 LSOAs that have no recent house price data - I gave them all a bottom ranking for house price just to get them out of the way.
You can find the LSOA for a specific post code if you enter the post code here: https://www.doogal.co.uk/ShowMap.php Under: Lower layer super output area
Sources: Office for National Statistics. (2019). HPSSA Dataset 46: Median price paid for residential properties by LSOA, 2019 (Table 1). London: Office for National Statistics.
Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government. (2019). English indices of deprivation 2019 (File 5: scores for the indices of deprivation). London: Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government.

LSOA code (2011) Local Authority District name (2019) Median House Price (Year ending June 2019) Deprivation Score House Price Score Overall Score
E01024997 Fylde £75,000 0.888 0.980 0.870
E01008479 North Tyneside £103,975 0.914 0.928 0.848
E01022368 Stroud £116,450 0.926 0.898 0.832
E01009799 Dudley £95,500 0.864 0.943 0.815
E01012246 Stockton-on-Tees £109,000 0.878 0.918 0.806
E01020605 County Durham £130,000 0.925 0.857 0.793
E01012182 Redcar and Cleveland £137,500 0.951 0.829 0.788
E01025468 West Lancashire £133,000 0.921 0.845 0.778
E01019640 Erewash £145,000 0.961 0.807 0.776
E01025695 Charnwood £146,250 0.963 0.801 0.771
E01012957 East Riding of Yorkshire £112,000 0.845 0.910 0.769
E01033534 South Derbyshire £107,000 0.833 0.922 0.768
E01029198 South Somerset £115,000 0.837 0.904 0.757
E01013277 North Lincolnshire £123,500 0.844 0.879 0.741
E01027403 Northumberland £163,000 0.989 0.744 0.736
E01029791 Staffordshire Moorlands £130,000 0.846 0.857 0.726
E01018502 Cheshire East £157,000 0.940 0.765 0.720
E01032546 Darlington £130,000 0.835 0.857 0.716
E01025345 Ribble Valley £162,500 0.959 0.747 0.716
E01032706 Swindon £144,500 0.884 0.808 0.714
E01033184 Richmondshire £110,900 0.780 0.912 0.711
E01032685 Salford £157,475 0.927 0.764 0.708
E01024970 Chorley £155,000 0.913 0.774 0.707
E01026294 South Kesteven £160,000 0.930 0.756 0.704
E01008199 Gateshead £110,000 0.767 0.916 0.703
E01006312 Wigan £148,975 0.884 0.794 0.702
E01028235 Mansfield £132,000 0.826 0.849 0.701
E01026187 North Kesteven £164,750 0.946 0.741 0.701
E01019124 Allerdale £160,000 0.924 0.756 0.699
E01019288 Copeland £152,500 0.894 0.781 0.698
E01008724 Sunderland £169,950 0.964 0.723 0.698
E01011113 Kirklees £158,500 0.912 0.760 0.694
E01029536 Newcastle-under-Lyme £145,500 0.863 0.803 0.693
E01008292 Newcastle upon Tyne £132,750 0.816 0.845 0.690
E01033107 Kingston upon Hull, City of £150,000 0.871 0.791 0.689
E01013194 North East Lincolnshire £145,500 0.857 0.803 0.688
E01007896 Sheffield £160,000 0.902 0.756 0.682
E01010947 Calderdale £167,000 0.932 0.731 0.681
E01025600 Wyre £146,500 0.849 0.801 0.679
E01012609 Blackburn with Darwen £148,000 0.853 0.797 0.679
E01019255 Carlisle £143,250 0.836 0.810 0.678
E01018554 Cheshire West and Chester £173,500 0.954 0.709 0.676
E01011971 Hartlepool £148,000 0.846 0.797 0.674
E01029709 Stafford £180,000 0.975 0.688 0.671
E01025039 Hyndburn £160,000 0.887 0.756 0.671
E01019462 Amber Valley £165,975 0.913 0.733 0.669
E01025406 South Ribble £138,000 0.809 0.827 0.669
E01007475 Doncaster £142,500 0.822 0.813 0.669
E01027944 Ashfield £137,000 0.804 0.831 0.668
E01011812 Wakefield £162,500 0.892 0.747 0.666
E01014123 Telford and Wrekin £123,000 0.755 0.880 0.665
E01011306 Leeds £146,000 0.827 0.802 0.664
E01025255 Preston £170,313 0.924 0.717 0.662
E01007752 Rotherham £140,000 0.806 0.821 0.662
E01013514 Derby £162,498 0.883 0.747 0.660
E01012048 Middlesbrough £142,250 0.810 0.814 0.659
E01028177 Gedling £151,000 0.840 0.784 0.659
E01007428 Barnsley £134,000 0.779 0.843 0.657
E01029665 South Staffordshire £169,750 0.904 0.724 0.654
E01019790 North East Derbyshire £165,000 0.881 0.740 0.652
E01006841 St. Helens £137,500 0.786 0.829 0.651
E01024862 Burnley £110,000 0.709 0.916 0.650
E01028097 Broxtowe £180,000 0.943 0.688 0.649
E01007308 Wirral £135,000 0.772 0.840 0.649
E01014265 Stoke-on-Trent £151,375 0.827 0.783 0.648
E01026160 Lincoln £144,000 0.796 0.809 0.644
E01009559 Coventry £129,975 0.746 0.858 0.640
E01029419 East Staffordshire £158,000 0.839 0.762 0.640
E01010296 Walsall £170,000 0.885 0.722 0.639
E01026402 West Lindsey £169,950 0.882 0.723 0.638
E01033103 North West Leicestershire £189,750 0.969 0.658 0.637
E01025839 Hinckley and Bosworth £145,000 0.789 0.807 0.637
E01005572 Rochdale £158,500 0.835 0.760 0.635
E01028361 Rushcliffe £189,750 0.964 0.658 0.634
E01027623 Hambleton £194,000 0.986 0.643 0.634
E01027565 Craven £182,500 0.933 0.678 0.633
E01008627 South Tyneside £133,000 0.748 0.845 0.632
E01028061 Bassetlaw £145,000 0.783 0.807 0.632
E01027845 Scarborough £170,000 0.875 0.722 0.632
E01020146 South Hams £173,000 0.889 0.710 0.631
E01004803 Bolton £175,000 0.893 0.706 0.631
E01012555 Warrington £164,975 0.849 0.740 0.629
E01027879 Selby £174,000 0.884 0.708 0.626
E01019540 Chesterfield £168,000 0.859 0.728 0.626
E01033528 Shropshire £148,750 0.788 0.794 0.626
E01019478 Bolsover £167,500 0.856 0.730 0.625
E01022427 Tewkesbury £181,000 0.911 0.682 0.621
E01006097 Trafford £183,000 0.917 0.677 0.621
E01015108 Plymouth £162,000 0.826 0.748 0.618
E01029377 Cannock Chase £167,498 0.844 0.730 0.616
E01025365 Rossendale £129,000 0.716 0.860 0.616
E01025776 Harborough £188,250 0.929 0.660 0.613
E01019753 High Peak £155,000 0.790 0.774 0.612
E01012374 Halton £180,000 0.886 0.688 0.610
E01025650 Blaby £196,000 0.958 0.636 0.609
E01005052 Bury £175,000 0.863 0.706 0.609
E01005418 Oldham £160,000 0.803 0.756 0.607
E01026263 South Holland £170,500 0.846 0.717 0.606
E01026053 East Lindsey £138,500 0.734 0.826 0.606
E01031040 North Warwickshire £146,500 0.756 0.801 0.605
E01032842 Basingstoke and Deane £177,500 0.868 0.695 0.604
E01025165 Lancaster £170,000 0.836 0.722 0.604
E01033752 Liverpool £156,250 0.786 0.767 0.603
E01010706 Bradford £165,000 0.814 0.740 0.602
E01028288 Newark and Sherwood £159,250 0.792 0.758 0.600
E01027791 Ryedale £179,000 0.868 0.690 0.599
E01022340 Gloucester £168,500 0.817 0.727 0.594
E01026035 Boston £163,648 0.799 0.742 0.593
E01015626 Peterborough £148,000 0.743 0.797 0.592
E01029894 Babergh £204,500 0.962 0.614 0.591
E01025991 Oadby and Wigston £190,000 0.899 0.656 0.590
E01019347 South Lakeland £180,500 0.863 0.682 0.589
E01032324 Worcester £195,000 0.917 0.641 0.588
E01006062 Tameside £191,000 0.897 0.651 0.584
E01007070 Sefton £179,950 0.847 0.689 0.584
E01027075 East Northamptonshire £207,500 0.962 0.606 0.583
E01027715 Harrogate £215,000 0.983 0.587 0.577
E01019334 Eden £175,000 0.813 0.706 0.574
E01019622 Derbyshire Dales £190,000 0.874 0.656 0.574
E01025214 Pendle £150,750 0.727 0.784 0.571
E01010565 Wolverhampton £159,000 0.750 0.759 0.569
E01031879 Wiltshire £196,000 0.888 0.636 0.565
E01021560 Chelmsford £197,500 0.893 0.632 0.564
E01013411 York £200,000 0.902 0.626 0.564
E01014821 North Somerset £165,475 0.766 0.734 0.562
E01032865 Leicester £175,000 0.795 0.706 0.561
E01029848 Tamworth £192,500 0.867 0.647 0.561
E01025893 Melton £184,000 0.831 0.675 0.561
E01029263 Somerset West and Taunton £194,000 0.871 0.643 0.560
E01014087 Herefordshire, County of £158,000 0.734 0.762 0.559
E01030078 Mid Suffolk £206,000 0.919 0.608 0.559
E01032231 Redditch £188,000 0.846 0.661 0.559
E01019185 Barrow-in-Furness £153,000 0.717 0.779 0.558
E01014874 South Gloucestershire £212,000 0.937 0.592 0.555
E01029495 Lichfield £182,250 0.812 0.679 0.551
E01031112 Nuneaton and Bedworth £191,000 0.839 0.651 0.546
E01026472 Breckland £178,000 0.784 0.693 0.544
E01027125 Kettering £212,498 0.919 0.591 0.543
E01022720 Fareham £220,000 0.946 0.574 0.543
E01032197 Malvern Hills £174,500 0.764 0.707 0.540
E01032817 Ashford £138,225 0.651 0.826 0.538
E01017190 Southampton £165,000 0.726 0.740 0.537
E01027008 Daventry £184,000 0.792 0.675 0.534
E01005811 Stockport £215,000 0.906 0.587 0.532
E01030292 East Suffolk £220,500 0.935 0.568 0.531
E01031742 Mid Sussex £210,000 0.885 0.600 0.531
E01032448 Wyre Forest £192,000 0.818 0.648 0.530
E01009976 Sandwell £137,500 0.640 0.829 0.530
E01032885 Solihull £216,250 0.912 0.581 0.530
E01019925 East Devon £215,000 0.899 0.587 0.527
E01026644 King's Lynn and West Norfolk £222,500 0.931 0.565 0.526
E01026519 Broadland £185,000 0.783 0.672 0.526
E01020450 Dorset £213,000 0.889 0.590 0.524
E01026815 Norwich £233,500 0.981 0.533 0.523
E01028465 Cherwell £235,000 0.982 0.531 0.521
E01018201 Huntingdonshire £205,000 0.840 0.613 0.515
E01020058 Mid Devon £215,000 0.878 0.587 0.515
E01033114 South Cambridgeshire £237,475 0.985 0.523 0.515
E01020270 Teignbridge £210,000 0.857 0.600 0.514
E01028756 Vale of White Horse £202,500 0.831 0.618 0.514
E01020964 Eastbourne £175,000 0.726 0.706 0.513
E01033410 Nottingham £155,250 0.666 0.769 0.513
E01027337 Wellingborough £165,000 0.692 0.740 0.512
E01031125 Rugby £188,000 0.774 0.661 0.511
E01032363 Wychavon £235,500 0.967 0.526 0.509
E01027264 South Northamptonshire £214,500 0.865 0.588 0.508
E01006476 Knowsley £176,500 0.726 0.698 0.507
E01020361 Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole £169,950 0.698 0.723 0.505
E01031672 Horsham £230,000 0.924 0.544 0.503
E01018796 Cornwall £219,500 0.874 0.575 0.503
E01033059 Bromsgrove £232,500 0.936 0.535 0.501
E01022123 Cheltenham £200,000 0.799 0.626 0.500
E01021438 Brentwood £240,000 0.961 0.517 0.497
E01013800 Rutland £218,250 0.862 0.577 0.497
E01033045 West Suffolk £223,000 0.881 0.563 0.496
E01023649 North Hertfordshire £200,000 0.792 0.626 0.495
E01032957 Aylesbury Vale £218,000 0.856 0.578 0.494
E01014470 Bath and North East Somerset £212,000 0.835 0.592 0.494
E01023141 Rushmoor £146,000 0.614 0.802 0.492
E01022257 Forest of Dean £202,000 0.790 0.619 0.489
E01024213 Dover £220,000 0.851 0.574 0.488
E01029033 Mendip £195,000 0.759 0.641 0.487
E01012718 Blackpool £151,000 0.619 0.784 0.485
E01027148 Northampton £223,000 0.861 0.563 0.485
E01016770 Milton Keynes £168,750 0.666 0.726 0.484
E01029115 Sedgemoor £235,000 0.908 0.531 0.482
E01021702 Colchester £160,000 0.636 0.756 0.481
E01009068 Birmingham £190,000 0.732 0.656 0.481
E01026945 South Norfolk £235,000 0.902 0.531 0.479
E01018058 Fenland £185,000 0.712 0.672 0.478
E01026582 Great Yarmouth £210,500 0.801 0.594 0.476
E01032965 Corby £230,000 0.869 0.544 0.473
E01029964 Ipswich £180,000 0.686 0.688 0.472
E01031314 Warwick £240,000 0.912 0.517 0.472
E01017069 Portsmouth £210,000 0.784 0.600 0.470
E01017301 Isle of Wight £235,000 0.877 0.531 0.466
E01020133 North Devon £212,500 0.786 0.591 0.465
E01020306 Torridge £216,500 0.796 0.581 0.462
E01019984 Exeter £235,000 0.869 0.531 0.462
E01023435 Dacorum £185,500 0.692 0.667 0.462
E01022867 Hart £244,000 0.962 0.479 0.461
E01022831 Gosport £175,000 0.650 0.706 0.459
E01024340 Maidstone £151,000 0.583 0.784 0.457
E01005277 Manchester £216,000 0.785 0.582 0.457
E01015227 Torbay £215,000 0.775 0.587 0.455
E01026758 North Norfolk £152,000 0.581 0.782 0.454
E01028630 South Oxfordshire £218,000 0.786 0.578 0.454
E01016081 Medway £240,000 0.873 0.517 0.452
E01023189 Test Valley £247,500 0.955 0.470 0.449
E01031812 Worthing £222,500 0.793 0.565 0.448
E01024802 Tunbridge Wells £234,000 0.841 0.532 0.448
E01022685 Eastleigh £219,000 0.776 0.576 0.447
E01032949 West Oxfordshire £249,000 0.956 0.467 0.446
E01031239 Stratford-on-Avon £215,750 0.762 0.582 0.444
E01023047 New Forest £248,500 0.945 0.467 0.442
E01033611 Thurrock £231,000 0.820 0.538 0.441
E01024434 Sevenoaks £210,000 0.733 0.600 0.440
E01022191 Cotswold £227,000 0.796 0.552 0.439
E01015806 Luton £228,000 0.799 0.548 0.438
E01030795 Surrey Heath £240,000 0.830 0.517 0.429
E01022639 East Hampshire £210,000 0.708 0.600 0.425
E01023243 Winchester £260,000 0.964 0.440 0.424
E01021416 Braintree £193,530 0.648 0.643 0.417
E01024107 Canterbury £252,500 0.910 0.455 0.414
E01030671 Runnymede £266,250 0.978 0.422 0.412
E01016311 West Berkshire £252,475 0.905 0.455 0.412
E01018029 East Cambridgeshire £247,000 0.872 0.471 0.411
E01022067 Uttlesford £205,000 0.669 0.613 0.411
E01017589 Central Bedfordshire £212,500 0.678 0.591 0.401
E01022015 Tendring £234,750 0.754 0.531 0.401
E01032835 Crawley £223,750 0.711 0.562 0.400
E01024722 Tonbridge and Malling £263,750 0.920 0.429 0.395
E01021221 Wealden £235,000 0.736 0.531 0.391
E01017553 Bedford £266,995 0.925 0.421 0.389
E01020338 West Devon £206,500 0.632 0.607 0.384
E01003663 Redbridge £190,000 0.574 0.656 0.377
E01016424 Reading £274,000 0.920 0.405 0.373
E01021094 Rother £232,500 0.693 0.535 0.371
E01016659 Wokingham £282,000 0.953 0.384 0.366
E01023776 Stevenage £235,000 0.687 0.531 0.365
E01024542 Folkestone and Hythe £240,000 0.701 0.517 0.363
E01014725 Bristol, City of £261,000 0.832 0.434 0.361
E01022922 Havant £260,000 0.813 0.440 0.358
E01032655 Swale £272,500 0.872 0.408 0.356
E01021881 Maldon £250,000 0.765 0.464 0.355
E01016585 Windsor and Maidenhead £282,000 0.922 0.384 0.354
E01030859 Tandridge £250,000 0.757 0.464 0.351
E01023457 East Hertfordshire £295,000 0.981 0.357 0.350
E01030627 Reigate and Banstead £290,000 0.948 0.367 0.348
E01021070 Lewes £200,000 0.550 0.626 0.344
E01030359 Elmbridge £244,500 0.717 0.479 0.343
E01024275 Gravesham £275,000 0.846 0.403 0.341
E01015913 Southend-on-Sea £280,000 0.855 0.391 0.334
E01016202 Bracknell Forest £280,000 0.854 0.391 0.334
E01031438 Arun £235,750 0.636 0.526 0.334
E01023808 Three Rivers £267,500 0.794 0.420 0.334
E01024692 Thanet £205,500 0.539 0.609 0.328
E01021825 Harlow £281,250 0.849 0.385 0.327
E01031369 Adur £280,000 0.827 0.391 0.324
E01000424 Bexley £288,000 0.870 0.370 0.322
E01021795 Epping Forest £283,750 0.847 0.380 0.322
E01021021 Hastings £196,000 0.499 0.636 0.317
E01024172 Dartford £205,000 0.509 0.613 0.312
E01030552 Mole Valley £293,750 0.870 0.358 0.312
E01017921 Wycombe £267,500 0.735 0.420 0.309
E01017002 Brighton and Hove £295,000 0.858 0.357 0.306
E01021916 Rochford £277,500 0.772 0.396 0.305
E01021346 Basildon £297,500 0.867 0.351 0.304
E01018006 Cambridge £300,000 0.859 0.347 0.298
E01002291 Havering £280,000 0.760 0.391 0.297
E01016473 Slough £250,000 0.635 0.464 0.295
E01032626 Waverley £321,000 0.977 0.299 0.292
E01030993 Woking £263,000 0.674 0.430 0.290
E01030429 Guildford £270,000 0.690 0.415 0.286
E01002662 Hounslow £225,000 0.511 0.560 0.286
E01002209 Harrow £285,000 0.749 0.378 0.283
E01004103 Sutton £300,000 0.815 0.347 0.283
E01023875 Watford £277,000 0.709 0.397 0.281
E01031486 Chichester £316,475 0.908 0.309 0.281
E01030727 Spelthorne £312,500 0.868 0.319 0.277
E01000006 Barking and Dagenham £205,000 0.441 0.613 0.271
E01021514 Castle Point £296,500 0.768 0.352 0.270
E01023740 St Albans £313,000 0.843 0.317 0.267
E01023913 Welwyn Hatfield £250,000 0.575 0.464 0.267
E01001059 Croydon £250,000 0.569 0.464 0.264
E01002536 Hillingdon £305,000 0.783 0.335 0.262
E01017770 Chiltern £297,498 0.741 0.351 0.260
E01028572 Oxford £333,750 0.936 0.278 0.260
E01001617 Greenwich £310,000 0.794 0.327 0.259
E01023559 Hertsmere £315,000 0.812 0.315 0.256
E01023320 Broxbourne £265,000 0.579 0.427 0.247
E01000717 Bromley £322,000 0.807 0.298 0.241
E01000576 Brent £260,000 0.532 0.440 0.234
E01003407 Merton £303,750 0.680 0.336 0.228
E01003354 Lewisham £217,000 0.388 0.580 0.225
E01004281 Tower Hamlets £345,000 0.816 0.260 0.212
E01002994 Kingston upon Thames £351,000 0.828 0.246 0.204
E01001537 Enfield £335,000 0.691 0.277 0.191
E01030399 Epsom and Ewell £309,250 0.576 0.327 0.188
E01001341 Ealing £335,000 0.647 0.277 0.179
E01003993 Southwark £196,938 0.269 0.634 0.170
E01000239 Barnet £270,000 0.399 0.415 0.166
E01000855 Camden £342,500 0.587 0.262 0.154
E01003831 Richmond upon Thames £382,500 0.740 0.202 0.149
E01004491 Wandsworth £353,000 0.601 0.244 0.147
E01033582 Newham £355,000 0.589 0.242 0.143
E01004404 Waltham Forest £236,250 0.263 0.525 0.138
E01017807 South Bucks £425,000 0.892 0.153 0.137
E01019077 Isles of Scilly £394,000 0.675 0.187 0.126
E01003153 Lambeth £385,000 0.583 0.200 0.116
E01002023 Haringey £415,000 0.562 0.164 0.092
E01004651 Westminster £466,000 0.776 0.118 0.091
E01002712 Islington £340,500 0.291 0.264 0.077
E01033710 Hackney £370,000 0.334 0.221 0.074
E01002862 Kensington and Chelsea £375,000 0.310 0.214 0.066
E01001874 Hammersmith and Fulham £395,000 0.348 0.187 0.065
E01000003 City of London £625,000 0.454 0.047 0.022
submitted by Enter_Laughing to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]


2019.11.11 10:00 FaceInTheSandpit 7 Millionaire Marxist Myths Debunked

On Twitter and Reddit recently, I've seen a lot of bad faith arguments posted by people who probably aren't bots and will be voting in the general election next month, about how Corbyn is actually a secret millionaire; meaning he is a filthy hypocrite, which is seemingly the absolute worst thing one can be.
Jonathan Swift wrote in 1710 that “Falsehood flies, and the Truth comes limping after it, so that when Men come to be undeceiv’d, it is too late”, but I hope some people can be reasoned out of these myths on the doorstep or online in the next month.
This is a list of the claims I've encountered nominally normal people using: where they come from, how they spread around the right-wing press, and I attempt to debunk with easily available evidence.
Sorry about the length.
1.) Corbyn is worth MILLIONS!
On Friday 8th November, the Express posted this article claiming Corbyn is worth £3m, a rehash of an article they posted in April; itself a version of these articles posted in the Mail and Telegraph in 2016.
All of these articles cite earlier versions of this page from Spears Magazine website, which claims Corbyn has a "net worth" £3m. Spears claims that "net worth content is calculated by applying a proprietary algorithm and is fact checked by our team of editors. We scan publicly available data and resources to ensure all our net worth data is the most accurate and up to date content on the Internet."
The article mentions nothing that would illustrate Corbyn's apparent £3m current net worth: nothing about property, stocks, royalties, classic cars. Absolutely nothing. There is no methodology available, and the author (Rebecca Cameron) has no contact details or social profiles that I could find. I've used the Wayback Machine, and found that over all 14 iterations of the page cached between late 2017 and today, the text hasn't changed; while seemingly random amounts have been added or subtracted to keep it around the "£3m" figure.
The article does mention that Corbyn has "claimed over £3m from the state alone" after going into how his salary has increased since 1983. It also claims this is "£1.5 million more than a normal MP", without going into any detail about what a "normal MP" is.
I added up the historic wages of an MP since 1983, and it comes out to £1.7m. Now, while it's technically true that £3m is almost £1.5m more than £1.7m, Corbyn's total salaries have only added up to just over £2m over 36 years, including time as Leader of the Opposition.
I assume they have guesstimated the length of service of a "normal MP" as maybe 2 parliaments, and compared it to the 11th longest serving MP currently in the House. Very sound methodology.
They’re still a million off, though, even after assuming he saved every single penny; but maybe Corbyn has made clever savings and investments to make up the difference?
Corbyn has published his tax returns on his website since April 2016, which show very little in additional income. He receives no dividends and has no alternate employment. The £78 in interest on a high street savings account suggest a bank account of about £8,000. He receives a standard state pension, and his pension from the short time he spent as a union organiser. His only other income was £1,200 as "self-employed", which I assume was for speaking engagements or similar.
These are not the tax returns of someone with millions in the bank, massive investment portfolios or property income. They're the tax returns of someone who earns a top 5% salary after nearly four decades of public service, receives a state pension, pays all his taxes and gives between 2 and 5 percent of his annual income to charity, based on gift-aid receipts.
2.) He's like all the other MPs: just in it for the Gravy Train!
This is included because the Spears article is either slightly carelessly or very carefully worded, by using "claimed" instead of "earned". This leaves the door open to add MP’s expenses to the total.
Again, I did the maths, using the IPSA data set up in the wake of the expenses scandal. Including staffing and travel costs, Corbyn has definitely claimed more than £3m. Since 2010 - he has claimed almost £1.2m in expenses. But, this is very similar to other MPs, such as his staunchest ex-Labour critic The Independent Group For Change’s Chris Leslie (~£1.3m) and Conservative back bencher John Baron (~£1.2m), although much higher than Jacob Rees-Mogg (~£882k).
In 2017-18, specifically, Corbyn claimed £176,868; which is slightly higher than the average of £168,251 for all MPs, probably due to increased costs in London.
Without staffing costs, he's pretty cheap: having claimed only £151k in 10 years, compared to Leslie (£245k) and Baron (£166k), although, again, Rees-Mogg has only claimed £16k in non-staffing expense (possibly because his constituency office is seemingly registered as the dodgiest looking alleyway in all Somerset).
I even went back to 1983, guesstimating Corbyn's historical office spend using the inflation-adjusted version of the average from the 2010-18 period; which came out to only £453,180 over 36 years.
So, no. Corbyn hasn't claimed significantly more or less than average, and including his office spend over his entire career wouldn't even increase the totalled earnings to £3m.
For reference, Spears magazine itself was founded and is majority owned by Willliam Cash#Personal_life), one-time UKIP candidate and now hardline Conservative supporter, the son of veteran Eurosceptic MP and solicitor Sir Bill Cash, himself of the top scammers of the expenses scandal. It could be that they are not entirely impartial.
3.) Corbyn has a £1.6m pension!
This is, again, mentioned in the Spears page; but no detail is given. The Telegraph does go into more detail, providing an estimate from Tom McPhail, a senior pensions researcher at Hargreaves Lansdown, to look into the scale of Corbyn's pension, who reached the conclusion that it was " gold-plated pension which will pay out almost £50,000 a year".
That's an amazing pension, but our boy is already 70. The average life expectancy for a chap in Islington is just shy of 78 years old. Because of his cycling, relatively healthy lifestyle and childhood in semi-rural Shropshire, we can hope that Corbyn will live longer, but even if he gets to a solid 90; he's only going to get £1m of his pension.
Where's the other £600k? Well, the valuation was done by Hargreaves Lansdown based on the 2016 market value of buying into the funds used by the MPs pension scheme. This is, firstly, impossible for a random person to do completely, and secondly wouldn't take into account the historical ups and downs of the funds or previous portfolios of the scheme.
Completely coincidentally, at the time, Peter Hargreaves, founder and majority shareholder of Hargreaves Lansdown, had just donated £3.2m to Arron Banks' Leave.EU campaign while “pining” for Thatcher.
4.) Corbyn's house is worth millions!
Again, the Express and Mail are mostly guilty here. In late 2016, the house next door to Corbyn's went on sale for £925,000; causing a tabloid frenzy. If you look carefully and think about it very hard, you’ll notice that £925,000 isn’t actually over a million pounds.
The implication that Corbyn's house is going to be worth anything like as much of his neighbours is just plain misleading: the house next door underwent a £120,000 complete redesign and extension by award-winning architects Archmongers LLC in 2014, the owners having bought it for £395,000 in 2013. There was one sale on his street that topped £1m since, in 2019, but this was of a much larger, much classier Victorian terrace at the nicer end of the street.
The previous sale of Corbyn's house, presumably when he bought it, was for £363,000 in Spring 2007, just months before the international mortgage bubble burst, sending property values tumbling by tens of thousands, which took 6-8 years to go back to the pre-2007 values, as evidenced by the sale of the next door house for a similar amount.
It appears from Rightmove that most of the similar houses on his street have been converted into flats, and they are still going for about £400k, suggesting Corbyn's gaff probably wouldn't be worth much more than £800k unless it had some serious work done to it.
5.) Corbyn owns a second home in the countryside!
No. He doesn't. He has no other property listed as over £100,000 or providing £10,000+ rental income on the MP's Register of Interest. If he did own a second home, it's dirt cheap and/or he rents it out at far below market value. If he actually owned a second home, the Mail would be all over it.
For reference, Boris Johnson has just sold his £3.75m house, also in Islington, as well as owning 20% share of a property in Somerset and a 50% share of another house in London.
I have seen someone image search "Corbyn 2nd Home" and screenshot it to proudly present to me as 'evidence' which showed three pictures, each with the headlines "Corbyn's childhood country home..." below.
6.) So Corbyn is actually posh! He inherited wealth!
This an argument taken from a Telegraph article in 2015, where Corbyn is described as "to the manor born", growing up in an apparently posh rural idyll. A lot of the detail provided in this article, and the ones that spawned from it, have been taken from Corbyn's elder brother Piers Corbyn.
Piers appears very much the black sheep of the family; a 'metereologist', who has apparently developed his own solar-based climate prediction system, which is not peer reviewed, for predicting weather patterns, and denies the IPCC climate report on action against climate change.
Going even further, Piers denies anthropogenic climate change as a whole - claiming that CO2 is "the Life Gas" on his website, WeatherAction; which makes just slightly more sense than TimeCube. While he appears to be a terrible scientist, he seemingly much better at self-aggrandisement.
One detail not provided by Piers that would be publicly verifiable would be the that when Corbyn's mother died in 1987, her estate was valued at "almost £250,000". After inflation, this is the equivalent of £690,000. For reference, this would only have barely met the current threshold for inheritance tax.
The Daily Mail accidentally shot the Telegraph's argument that Corbyn comes from wealth in the foot, when the Mail jumped on the fact that the house was sold in 2016 for £650,000. This suggests that there was nothing in the estate other than the value of the house.
This means that Corbyn did inherit some wealth - A 1/4 share of the value of his mother's house, which, in today's money, it would have been a £172,000 share for each brother. This is a lot of money, but it is not a totally unreasonable sum for a pair of middle-class professionals to leave their children; his mother was a scientist and his father an electrical engineer, who were both already working by the late 1930s, when they met at an AntiFa rally against the rise of Franco.
Corbyn did go to a private prep school, but then passed his 11+ to go on to state grammar.
As a point of comparison (and an indulgence in whataboutery of my own), I'd like to submit the positive coverage of Zac Goldsmith's run at London Mayor in 2016. Many articles were published by the Telegraph, but this one is probably the puffiest, covering Zac's love of birds as a child, while letting him say he was " born into a position of privilege and am therefore not corruptible" without any criticism. Zac is now an heir to both the Goldsmith and Rothschild fortunes, after having an affair with and later marrying his brother's fiancé.
This was also around about the same time it emerged that David Cameron had received £300,000 from his father's estate, an additional £200,000 gift from his mother apparently made to dodge inheritance tax, and also that he had held shares in his father's Panama investment fund Blairmore Holdings prior to becoming PM, and he and his wife still held shares in his father's other Panama investment fund, Blairmore Investments.
7.) His MEXICAN THIRD WIFE is a brutal capitalist millionaire, he launders his fortune through her!
This was first brought up in the Mail in 2015, when they (for once) attempted to do 'a journalism', and went to Mexican coffee farms apparently owned by Laura Alvarez-Tonis, who they mention is Jeremy Corbyn's "third wife" three times in 1,300 words; meaning 0.5% of the article is "third wife".
The Daily Mail article obfuscates constantly as to whether Alvarez owns Cafe Mam, who apparently underpay their workers and keep them in terrible slave conditions; while they state the company is "estimated to be worth more than £600,000".
There are a couple of issues with this, one found in a response from the Fairtrade Foundation, when they explained that 2015 was a terrible year for all coffee growers due to fungal infections wiping out 40% of the Mexican crop and that the farms in question do not produce much in the way of coffee anyway.
The second, and more glaring issue, Alvarez doesn't own Cafe Mam.
Cafe Mam don't even own the farms: a conglomerate of self-employed farmers own ISMAM, which sells some of their coffee beans at Fairtrade price to an importert, Blue Royal Organics, who sell to their sister company, a roastery and distributor called Cafe Mam, both based in Oregon. Cafe Mam, in turn, export their coffee brand over the world to various companies, including Mexica Products Ltd, which is one of the UK distributors and is actually owned by Alvarez. The Mail uses Mexica Products,Cafe Mam and ISMAM interchangeably throughout the article in an attempt to confuse you into thinking Alvarez is responsible for all of the production chain.
In 2015, 2017 and 2018; Alvarez filed accounts with Companies House for Mexica Products Ltd as a micro-entity, which means they have a turnover of less than £600,000 and less than ten staff. In 2016, however, she filed as a small company. This could be where the Daily Mail got the company's estimated worth in a later update, but a look at those returns, suggests that Mexica Products Ltd probably lost money that year due to Alvarez' dividend as sole shareholder being minus £3k. The filing as a small company could have been a mistake by an accountant. In the moderately unlikely event that she did have more than a £600,000 turnover that year or had more than ten staff, that isn't how even valuations of companies work.
Either way, that doesn’t represent millions in the bank from Alvarez either.
This old, debunked story has recently been picked up by far right conspiracy site, Liberty Defenders, in a "100% FACTUAL" February 2019 blog post by Jack Sen, a man so racist he managed to get kicked out of UKIP, Britain First and the BNP so formed the British Renaissance chapter of the literal Nazi group, the European Knights Project. The post gained traction on the right because of Liberty Defender's open use of Russian bot farms. Jack Sen, who described black people as "cursed" on national telly, is probably not arguing in good faith for poor Mexican farmers.
On a side note, I'm still impressed and appalled, but not at all surprised by, the absolute brass neck of the Mail to consistently disparage Corbyn being on marriage number three aged 70, while mostly supporting Boris, who in his short 55 years has been married twice (he married his second wife, who was 8 months pregnant at the time, just 12 days after splitting up wife number one), and has had numerous affairs and illegitimate children throughout his life.
submitted by FaceInTheSandpit to LabourUK [link] [comments]


2019.08.23 07:09 hikerrambler21 Links to definitive maps for the sake of walk planning & footpath research

Here's a list I've compiled, it's about 90% complete. Visit your area and click on the layers options to call up the local council's official record of Rights of Way.
These are really useful but are often completely buried on council sites, hard to find! Even the OS maps follow their lead, so this is a solid resource. enjoy.
Ps. the highways layers show whether a small lane is a public highway or private road - often important for reaching paths that pass by in a field.
Current Definitive Maps
Bedfordshire Borough of BedfordBedford http://bedford-borough.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=874e8da21b074a29b9d2d8fcf6b9c491/
Bedfordshire Central Bedfordshire http://my.centralbedfordshire.gov.uk/?ms=CentralBeds/AllMaps&layers=cbc_boundary_only,row_legal_network&starteasting=512647.49908447&startnorthing=238829.50027466&startzoom=1995/
Berkshire Borough of WokinghamWokingham https://wokingham.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=efc4f39c97e54f19989e7a1fa94f5d27/
Berkshire Bracknell Forest http://maps.bracknell-forest.gov.uk/wml/Map.aspx?MapName=RightsOfWay
Berkshire City of London https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/city-of-london-eng/
Berkshire West Berkshire https://gis1.westberks.gov.uk/ApplicationTemplates/OnlineMap/?vln=PUBLIC%20RIGHTS%20OF%20WAY/
Berkshire Windsor and Maidenhead http://mol.rbwm.gov.uk/mol/map/
Bristol Bristol https://www.bristol.gov.uk/streets-travel/public-rights-of-way-service
Buckinghamshire Aylesbury Vale https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/aylesbury-aylesbury-vale
Buckinghamshire Borough of Milton KeynesMilton Keynes https://mapping.milton-keynes.gov.uk/mymiltonkeynes.aspx?MapSource=MiltonKeynes/AllMaps&StartEasting=485085&StartNorthing=239043&StartZoom=3000&o=1&Layers=traffic_transport.highway_adopt
Buckinghamshire Chiltern DistrictChiltern http://62.105.160.24/www.chilternsociety.org.uk/htdocs/shop-maps.php
Buckinghamshire South Bucks https://prow.buckscc.gov.uk/
Buckinghamshire Wycombe DistrictWycombe http://www.westwycombe.org.uk/images/wwy_dm.pdf
Cambridgeshire Cambridge Unknown website
Cambridgeshire East Cambridgeshire https://www.eastcambs.gov.uk/a-to-z/letter-a
Cambridgeshire Fenland DistrictFenland https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/the-fens-fenland
Cambridgeshire Huntingdonshire Unknown website
Cambridgeshire South Cambridgeshire https://my.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/myCambridgeshire.aspx?MapSource=CCC /AllMaps&Layers=row,row-TROs&tab=maps
Cheshire Borough of HaltonHalton Unknown website
Cheshire Cheshire East https://maps.cheshireeast.gov.uk/ce/webmapping
Cheshire Cheshire West and Chester Unknown website
Cheshire Warrington https://mapping.warrington.gov.uk/wml/Map.aspx?MapName=WBC
Cornwall Cornwall (district)Cornwall https://www.cornwall.gov.uk/environment-and-planning/countryside/public-rights-of-way/definitive-map-and-statement/
Cornwall Isles of Scilly https://www.visitcornwall.com/places/isles-of-scilly
County DurhamDurham Borough of DarlingtonDarlington https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/darlington-eng/
County DurhamDurham Borough of HartlepoolHartlepool https://www.mylpg.eu/stations/united-kingdom/station/w-Morrison-Supermarkets-Plc-Hartlepool-1EFEBF69-4AFB-2B79-B742-09B100A62273
County DurhamDurham County Durham (district)County Durham https://maps.durham.gov.uk/OLBasic2/Index.aspx?appid=66
County DurhamDurham/North Yorkshire Borough of Stockton-on-TeesStockton-on-Tees https://maps.stockport.gov.uk/myhouse.aspx
Cumbria Allerdale https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/lessonhall-allerdale/
Cumbria Borough of Barrow-in-FurnessBarrow-in-Furness https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/barrow-in-furness-eng/
Cumbria Borough of CopelandCopeland https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/hycemoor-copeland
Cumbria City of CarlisleCarlisle https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/carlisle-eng/
Cumbria Eden DistrictEden https://www.pocketroutes.co.uk/the-eden-way/
Cumbria South Lakeland https://apps1.wdm.co.uk/Pipcumbriahms/map.aspx?cg=PROW
Derbyshire Amber Valley https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Amber_Valley/
Derbyshire Bolsover DistrictBolsover Unknown website
Derbyshire Borough of ErewashErewash Unknown website
Derbyshire Chesterfield https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/chesterfield-eng/
Derbyshire Derby Unknown website
Derbyshire Derbyshire Dales Unknown website
Derbyshire High Peak, DerbyshireHigh Peak https://www.highpeak.gov.uk/hp/council-services/planning-and-buildings/interactive-planning-map
Derbyshire North East Derbyshire http://cnedramblers.altervista.org/DerbyshireROWos.htm
Derbyshire South Derbyshire Unknown website
Devon East Devon Unknown website
Devon Exeter https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/exeter-eng/
Devon Mid Devon https://dcc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=e1bcf0f17e0a4b898fb878bb9a55fb7d
Devon North Devon https://map.devon.gov.uk/dccvieweMyLocalPaths/
Devon Plymouth Unknown website
Devon South Hams https://dcc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=e1bcf0f17e0a4b898fb878bb9a55fb7d
Devon Teignbridge Unknown website
Devon Torbay https://www.torbay.gov.uk/gis/findmynearest/
Devon Torridge DistrictTorridge Unknown website
Devon West Devon https://map.devon.gov.uk/dccvieweMyLocalPaths/
Dorset Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/poole-bay-bournemouth
Dorset Dorset (unitary authority)Dorset Unknown website
East Riding of Yorkshire East Riding of Yorkshire (district)East Riding of Yorkshire https://www.eastriding.gov.uk/leisure/countryside-and-walks/public-rights-of-way/definitive-map/
East Riding of Yorkshire Kingston upon Hull http://web4.hullcc.gov.uk/HCCinternet/i4lg/pages/main/main.jsp
East Sussex Brighton and Hove https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/highway-search-information-map
East Sussex Eastbourne https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/eastbourne-eng/
East Sussex Hastings https://hastings-gis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=4831ccb4e8bc4a90aa83b48982e73340
East Sussex Lewes DistrictLewes Unknown website
East Sussex Rother DistrictRother http://www.rowmaps.com/showmap.php?place=Eckington&map=OS&lat=53.3095&lon=1.35621&lonew=W
East Sussex Wealden DistrictWealden Unknown website
Essex Borough of BasildonBasildon https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/basildon-eng/
Essex Borough of BrentwoodBrentwood https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/brentwood-eng/
Essex Borough of ColchesterColchester https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/colchester-eng/
Essex Braintree DistrictBraintree https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/braintree-eng/
Essex Castle Point https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/south-benfleet-castle-point
Essex City of ChelmsfordChelmsford https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/chelmsford-eng/
Essex Epping Forest DistrictEpping Forest Unknown website
Essex Harlow https://www.essexhighways.org/Transport-and-Roads/tell-us/Getting-Around/Public-Rights-of-Way/PRoW-Interactive-Map.aspx
Essex Maldon DistrictMaldon Unknown website
Essex Rochford DistrictRochford https://www.essexhighways.org/getting-around/public-rights-of-way/prow-interactive-map.aspx
Essex Southend-on-Sea https://www.essexhighways.org/getting-around/public-rights-of-way/prow-interactive-map.aspx
Essex Tendring DistrictTendring https://www.essexhighways.org/Transport-and-Roads/tell-us/Getting-Around/Public-Rights-of-Way/PRoW-Interactive-Map.aspx
Essex Thurrock Unknown website
Essex Uttlesford https://www.essexhighways.org/Getting-Around/public-rights-of-way/prow-interactive-map.aspx
Gloucestershire Cheltenham https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/cheltenham-eng/
Gloucestershire Cotswold DistrictCotswold Unknown website
Gloucestershire Forest of Dean DistrictForest of Dean https://www.gloucestershire.gov.uk/highways/public-rights-of-way/rights-of-way-online-map/
Gloucestershire Gloucester https://maps.gloucestershire.gov.uk/MapThatPublic/[email protected]@83
Gloucestershire South Gloucestershire http://www.outdoorswest.org.uk/map/
Gloucestershire Stroud DistrictStroud https://maps.gloucestershire.gov.uk/MapThatPublic/Default.aspx?tr[email protected]@83
Gloucestershire Tewkesbury BoroughTewkesbury Unknown website
Greater London Barking and Dagenham https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?ie=UTF8&t=m&oe=UTF8&msa=0&mid=1HloFUdORnp3u3EUZUqwcASxp7q8&ll=51.55562206689571%2C0.1278340000000071&z=12
Greater London City of WestminsterWestminster Unknown website
Greater London Hammersmith and Fulham https://data.gov.uk/data/map-preview?e=-1.34718&n=53.4994&s=52.79&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.nottinghamshire.gov.uk%2Fgeoserver%2Fwms%3Frequest%3DGetCapabilities&w=-0.656313
Greater London Haringey https://www.haringey.gov.uk/planning-and-building-control/planning/planning-policy/design-and-conservation/conservation-areas
Greater London Havering https://www.havering.gov.uk/download/downloads/id/2293/map_2_-_romford_hornchurch_upminster_rainham.pdf
Greater London London Borough of BarnetBarnet https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/barnet-eng/
Greater London London Borough of BexleyBexley https://www.open-walks.co.uk/Directory/Bexley/3337-Bexley-Definitive-Map/View-details.html
Greater London London Borough of BrentBrent https://www.pinns.co.uk/devon/southbrent.html
Greater London London Borough of BromleyBromley https://www.bromley.gov.uk/homepage/242/public_rights_of_way_in_bromley_-_location_map
Greater London London Borough of CamdenCamden Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of CroydonCroydon https://www.croydon.gov.uk/transportandstreets/rhps/prwenforce
Greater London London Borough of EalingEaling Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of EnfieldEnfield Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of GreenwichGreenwich Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of HackneyHackney Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of HarrowHarrow http://lbhillingdon.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=91b11349f29f40ec9770eba1108229ae
Greater London London Borough of HillingdonHillingdon Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of HounslowHounslow https://maps.hounslow.gov.uk/map/Aurora.svc/run?script=%5CAurora%5CFind_your_nearest_Highways_Register.AuroraScript%24&nocache=1720418021&resize=always
Greater London London Borough of IslingtonIslington https://mapapp.islington.gov.uk/mapthatv3/Default.aspx
Greater London London Borough of LambethLambeth https://www.lambeth.gov.uk/elections-and-council/about-lambeth/map-of-lambeth-council-services
Greater London London Borough of LewishamLewisham http://interactivemap.lewisham.gov.uk/MapThatWebTest/Default.aspx
Greater London London Borough of MertonMerton Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of RedbridgeRedbridge https://my.redbridge.gov.uk/map
Greater London London Borough of SouthwarkSouthwark Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of SuttonSutton Unknown website
Greater London London Borough of WandsworthWandsworth Unknown website
Greater London Newham https://www.newham.gov.uk/Documents/Transport%20and%20streets/ActiveNewhamCyclingMap.pdf
Greater London Richmond upon Thames https://gis.richmond.gov.uk/webmap/prow_01.aspx
Greater London Royal Borough of Kensington and ChelseaKensington and Chelsea https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=17MdNwRzLV8HjO02ew2hNr1TqAQ8&msa=0&ie=UTF8&t=h&ll=51.49678768591865%2C-0.17316339500280264&spn=0.149645%2C0.662613&z=13&output=embed
Greater London Royal Borough of Kingston upon ThamesKingston upon Thames https://maps.kingston.gov.uk/maps/MapPage.aspx?map=boroughMap
Greater London Tower Hamlets https://www.iow.gov.uk/rightsofwaymaps/
Greater London Waltham Forest Unknown website
Greater Manchester City of SalfordSalford Unknown website
Greater Manchester Manchester https://mappinggm.org.uk/gmodin/Unknownos_maps_light/10/53.5069/-2.3201
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of BoltonBolton https://maps.bolton.gov.uk/residents/mybolton.aspx?tab=maps&MapSource=Bolton/AllMaps
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of BuryBury https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/bury-eng/
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of OldhamOldham https://data.gov.uk/data/map-preview?url=http%3A%2F%2Finspire.oldham.gov.uk%3A8080%2Fgeoserver%2Fwms%3Fservice%3DWMS%26request%3DGetCapabilities&wfsurl=https%3A%2F%2Fdata.gov.uk%2Fdata%2Fwfs&resid=1446f927-9975-49f6-b212-684efe0a1835&resname=Highway+Recor
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of RochdaleRochdale Unknown website
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of StockportStockport https://www.stockport.gov.uk/stockport-public-rights-of-way/prow-map
Greater Manchester Metropolitan Borough of WiganWigan https://wigan.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=4f7b5595301a44abbef5bd1161ee94bd
Greater Manchester Tameside http://webgis2.tameside.gov.uk/planaccess/planaccess.asp?theme=Rights%20of%20Way&easting=394425&northing=399290&zoom=1000
Greater Manchester Trafford https://mappinggm.org.uk/gmodin/Unknownos_maps_light/10/53.4917/-2.3154
Hampshire (all districts covered) {{official websitehttp://localviewmaps.hants.gov.uk/LocalViewMaps/Sites/ROWOnline/}}
Hampshire Basingstoke and Deane https://www.oldmapsonline.org/en/Basingstoke_and_Deane
Hampshire Borough of EastleighEastleigh https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/eastleigh-eng/
Hampshire Borough of FarehamFareham https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/fareham-eng/
Hampshire Borough of HavantHavant Unknown website
Hampshire City of WinchesterWinchester Unknown website
Hampshire East Hampshire http://localviewmaps.hants.gov.uk/LocalViewMaps/Sites/ROWOnline/
Hampshire Gosport Unknown website
Hampshire Hart (district)Hart https://www.bracknell-forest.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/sheet-5-second-consolidated-definitive-map-prow.pdf
Hampshire New Forest DistrictNew Forest https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/50.85580063,-1.58605129,15
Hampshire Portsmouth https://www.portsmouth.gov.uk/ext/documents-external/trv-provisional-definitive-map1.pdf
Hampshire Rushmoor http://localviewmaps.hants.gov.uk/LocalViewMaps/Sites/ROWOnline/
Hampshire Southampton https://www.southampton.gov.uk/roads-parking/roads/rights-way-map.aspx
Hampshire Test Valley http://localviewmaps.hants.gov.uk/LocalViewMaps/Sites/ROWOnline/
Herefordshire Herefordshire https://www.herefordshire.gov.uk/info/200136/travel_and_transport/716/highways_and_public_rights_of_way_map
Hertfordshire Borough of BroxbourneBroxbourne https://www.broxbourne.gov.uk/resident-environment/public-rights-way
Hertfordshire Dacorum Unknown website
Hertfordshire East Hertfordshire Unknown website
Hertfordshire Hertsmere Unknown website
Hertfordshire North Hertfordshire https://webmaps.hertfordshire.gov.uk/row/row.htm
Hertfordshire St Albans City and DistrictSt Albans https://webmaps.hertfordshire.gov.uk/row/row.htm?layers=1:0,1,2,3,4
Hertfordshire Stevenage https://webmaps.hertfordshire.gov.uk/row/row.htm?layers=1:0,1,2,3,4
Hertfordshire Three Rivers DistrictThree Rivers Unknown website
Hertfordshire Watford Unknown website
Hertfordshire Welwyn Hatfield Unknown website
Isle of Wight Isle of Wight https://www.iow.gov.uk/rightsofwaymaps/
Kent Borough of AshfordAshford https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&ll=51.082390999999994%2C0.8380509999999504&spn=0.075487%2C0.145912&z=12&source=embed&mid=1aZkEqVchzz9lP1p7YzI10lAQ_ZY/
Kent Borough of DartfordDartford https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/dartford-eng/
Kent Borough of MaidstoneMaidstone Unknown website
Kent Borough of SwaleSwale Unknown website
Kent Borough of Tunbridge WellsTunbridge Wells Unknown website
Kent City of CanterburyCanterbury https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/canterbury-eng/
Kent Dover DistrictDover https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/dover-eng/
Kent Folkestone & Hythe DistrictFolkestone and Hythe https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/folkestone-eng/
Kent Gravesham http://webapps.kent.gov.uk/KCC.Libraries.Web.Sites.Public/LibraryDetails.aspx?aid=0&lid=41&uprn=100062311356
Kent Medway Unknown website
Kent Sevenoaks DistrictSevenoaks https://webapps.kent.gov.uk/countrysideaccesscams/standardmap.aspx
Kent Thanet DistrictThanet Unknown website
Kent Tonbridge and Malling Unknown website
Lancashire Blackburn with Darwen Unknown website
Lancashire Blackpool https://www.blackpool.gov.uk/Residents/Parking-roads-and-transport/Roadworks-and-road-maintenance/Public-rights-of-way.aspx
Lancashire Borough of BurnleyBurnley https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/burnley-eng/
Lancashire Borough of ChorleyChorley https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/chorley-eng/
Lancashire Borough of FyldeFylde Unknown website
Lancashire Borough of PendlePendle Unknown website
Lancashire Borough of RossendaleRossendale https://www.lancashire.gov.uk/roads-parking-and-travel/public-rights-of-way/public-rights-of-way-map/
Lancashire Borough of WyreWyre Unknown website
Lancashire City of LancasterLancaster Unknown website
Lancashire City of Preston, LancashirePreston Unknown website
Lancashire Hyndburn Unknown website
Lancashire Peterborough https://peterborough.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=3db1985200a7427facb9b7ea2f6126fa
Lancashire Ribble Valley http://mario.lancashire.gov.uk/agsmario/default.aspx
Lancashire South Ribble https://www.lancashire.gov.uk/roads-parking-and-travel/public-rights-of-way/public-rights-of-way-map/
Lancashire West Lancashire http://mario.lancashire.gov.uk/agsmario/default.aspx
Leicestershire Blaby DistrictBlaby https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/blaby-eng/
Leicestershire Borough of CharnwoodCharnwood https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/charnwood-forest-charnwood
Leicestershire Borough of MeltonMelton https://www.milton-keynes.gov.uk/leisure-tourism-and-culture/parks-and-open-spaces/rights-of-way
Leicestershire Harborough DistrictHarborough https://www.leicestershire.gov.uk/roads-and-travel/cycling-and-walking/where-to-walk-in-leicestershire
Leicestershire Hinckley and Bosworth Unknown website
Leicestershire Leicester https://www.leicestershire.gov.uk/roads-and-travel/cycling-and-walking/where-to-walk-in-leicestershire
Leicestershire North West Leicestershire https://www.leicestershire.gov.uk/roads-and-travel/cycling-and-walking/where-to-walk-in-leicestershire
Leicestershire Oadby and Wigston Unknown website
Lincolnshire Borough of BostonBoston Unknown website
Lincolnshire East Lindsey https://www.open-walks.co.uk/Directory/East-Lindsey/
Lincolnshire Lincoln, EnglandLincoln http://row.lincolnshire.gov.uk/map.aspx?act=Walking
Lincolnshire North East Lincolnshire http://row.lincolnshire.gov.uk/map.aspx?act=Walking
Lincolnshire North Kesteven https://aurora.central-lincs.org.uk/map/Aurora.svc/run?script=%5cShared+Services%5cJPU%5cJPUJS.AuroraScript%24&nocache=1206308816&resize=always
Lincolnshire North Lincolnshire http://row.lincolnshire.gov.uk/map.aspx?act=Walking
Lincolnshire South Holland, LincolnshireSouth Holland http://row.lincolnshire.gov.uk/map.aspx?act=Walking
Lincolnshire South Kesteven http://row.lincolnshire.gov.uk/map.aspx?act=Motorists
Lincolnshire West Lindsey Unknown website
Merseyside Liverpool Unknown website
Merseyside Metropolitan Borough of KnowsleyKnowsley https://highways.knowsley.gov.uk/
Merseyside Metropolitan Borough of SeftonSefton http://maps.sefton.gov.uk/webmaplayers/
Merseyside Metropolitan Borough of St HelensSt Helens Unknown website
Merseyside Metropolitan Borough of WirralWirral Unknown website
Norfolk Borough of Great YarmouthGreat Yarmouth http://maps.norfolk.gov.uk/highways/
Norfolk Breckland DistrictBreckland Unknown website
Norfolk Broadland https://www.open-walks.co.uk/Directory/Broadland/
Norfolk King's Lynn and West Norfolk https://maps.norfolk.gov.uk/highways/
Norfolk North Norfolk https://maps.norfolk.gov.uk/highways/
Norfolk Norwich https://ncc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=7ff6d4cdf8ca4d70b50e935fec378e11
Norfolk South Norfolk https://apps1.wdm.co.uk/Pipcumbriahms/map.aspx?cg=PROW
North Yorkshire Borough of HarrogateHarrogate https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-road-map-of-yorkshire-england-showing-the-harrogate-and-wetherby-area-99673285.html
North Yorkshire Craven https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/thornton-in-craven-craven
North Yorkshire Hambleton DistrictHambleton https://maps.northyorks.gov.uk/connect/analyst/?mapcfg=Out_and_About
North Yorkshire Middlesbrough http://rightsofway.middlesbrough.gov.uk/standardmap.aspx
North Yorkshire Redcar and Cleveland https://www.redcar-cleveland.gov.uk/resident/Pages/MyRedcar.aspx
North Yorkshire Richmondshire Unknown website
North Yorkshire Ryedale https://maps.northyorks.gov.uk/connect/analyst/?mapcfg=Out_and_About
North Yorkshire Scarborough (borough)Scarborough https://maps.northyorks.gov.uk/connect/analyst/?mapcfg=Out_and_About
North Yorkshire Selby DistrictSelby https://maps.northyorks.gov.uk/connect/analyst/?mapcfg=Out_and_About
North Yorkshire York https://cyc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Embed/index.html?webmap=4c8549252c45409e9efd3b594aa2944c&extent=-1.3353,53.8604,-0.7353,54.0616&home=true&zoom=true&scale=true&search=true&searchextent=false&details=true&legend=true&active_panel=legend&theme=light
Northamptonshire Borough of KetteringKettering Unknown website
Northamptonshire Borough of WellingboroughWellingborough Unknown website
Northamptonshire Corby https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/corby-eng/
Northamptonshire Daventry DistrictDaventry https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/daventry-eng/
Northamptonshire East Northamptonshire https://maps.northamptonshire.gov.uk/Unknownx=479000,y=269000,zoom=0,base=NCC,layers=,search=,fade=false,mX=0,mY=0
Northamptonshire Northampton http://maps.northamptonshire.gov.uk/
Northamptonshire South Northamptonshire http://maps.northamptonshire.gov.uk/
Northumberland Northumberland https://data.gov.uk/data/map-preview?e=-1.440826&n=55.845868&s=54.771536&url=http%3A%2F%2Fgis.northumberland.gov.uk%2Farcgis%2Fservices%2FLiveServices%2FPROW%2FMapServer%2FWMSServer%3F&w=-2.694106
Nottinghamshire Ashfield, NottinghamshireAshfield https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/kirkby-in-ashfield-ashfield
Nottinghamshire Bassetlaw DistrictBassetlaw https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/tiln-bassetlaw
Nottinghamshire Borough of BroxtoweBroxtowe Unknown website
Nottinghamshire Borough of GedlingGedling Unknown website
Nottinghamshire Mansfield DistrictMansfield Unknown website
Nottinghamshire Newark and Sherwood https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/53.07580185,-0.80773676,15
Nottinghamshire Nottingham Unknown website
Nottinghamshire Rushcliffe Unknown website
Oxfordshire Cherwell DistrictCherwell Unknown website
Oxfordshire Oxford https://publicrightsofway.oxfordshire.gov.uk/Web/standardmap.aspx
Oxfordshire South Oxfordshire https://publicrightsofway.oxfordshire.gov.uk/Web/standardmap.aspx
Oxfordshire Vale of White Horse https://publicrightsofway.oxfordshire.gov.uk/Web/standardmap.aspx
Oxfordshire West Oxfordshire https://publicrightsofway.oxfordshire.gov.uk/Web/standardmap.aspx
Rutland Rutland Unknown website
Shropshire Shropshire (district)Shropshire https://shropshire.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=00a0e03e79ee453ab6b787961ab192ec
Shropshire Telford and Wrekin Unknown website
Somerset Bath and North East Somerset https://www.bathnes.gov.uk/services/streets-and-highway-maintenance/public-rights-way/definitive-map-and-statement
Somerset Mendip DistrictMendip http://map.n-somerset.gov.uk/dande.html
Somerset North Somerset http://map.n-somerset.gov.uk/dande.html
Somerset Sedgemoor Unknown website
Somerset Somerset West and Taunton Unknown website
Somerset South Somerset Unknown website
South Yorkshire Metropolitan Borough of BarnsleyBarnsley https://www.barnsley.gov.uk/services/parks-and-open-spaces/public-footpaths-and-rights-of-way/public-rights-of-way/
South Yorkshire Metropolitan Borough of DoncasterDoncaster http://www.doncaster.gov.uk/maps/walking-map
South Yorkshire Metropolitan Borough of RotherhamRotherham https://www.rotherham.gov.uk/homepage/219/public_ways
South Yorkshire Sheffield http://www.rowmaps.com/showmap.php?place=Eckington&map=OS&lat=53.3095&lon=1.35621&lonew=W
Staffordshire Borough of Newcastle-under-LymeNewcastle-under-Lyme https://www.viamichelin.com/web/Maps/Map-Newcastle_under_Lyme-_-Staffordshire-United_Kingdom
Staffordshire Borough of StaffordStafford https://apps2.staffordshire.gov.uk/WEB/OnTheMap/RuralAccess
Staffordshire Borough of TamworthTamworth http://www.tamworth.gov.uk/sites/default/files/planning_docs/golf_course/Plans/Golf_Course_Public_Rights_of_Way.pdf
Staffordshire Cannock Chase DistrictCannock Chase Unknown website
Staffordshire East Staffordshire https://www.staffordshire.gov.uk/environment/RightsofWay/Footpaths-bridleways.aspx
Staffordshire Lichfield DistrictLichfield https://data.gov.uk/data/map-preview?e=-1.586014&n=52.810899&s=52.58676&url=http%3A%2F%2Fgis.lichfielddc.gov.uk%2Farcgis%2Fservices%2FPUBLIC%2FInspireLDC%2FMapServer%2FWMSServer%3Frequest%3DGetCapabilities%26service%3DWMS&w=-1.96406
Staffordshire South Staffordshire https://www.staffordshire.gov.uk/environment/RightsofWay/Footpaths-bridleways.aspx
Staffordshire Staffordshire Moorlands http://publicaccess.staffsmoorlands.gov.uk/portal/servlets/AttachmentShowServlet?ImageName=197816
Staffordshire Stoke-on-Trent https://www.staffordshire.gov.uk/environment/RightsofWay/Footpaths-bridleways.aspx
Suffolk Babergh https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/hadleigh-babergh/
Suffolk East Suffolk (district)East Suffolk Unknown website
Suffolk Ipswich https://www.ipswich.gov.uk/sites/default/files/definitive_rights_of_way_map_-_east.pdf
Suffolk Mid Suffolk Unknown website
Suffolk West Suffolk (district)West Suffolk Unknown website
Surrey Borough of ElmbridgeElmbridge Unknown website
Surrey Borough of GuildfordGuildford Unknown website
Surrey Borough of RunnymedeRunnymede Unknown website
Surrey Borough of SpelthorneSpelthorne http://surreymaps.surreycc.gov.uk/public/viewer.asp
Surrey Borough of WaverleyWaverley Unknown website
Surrey Borough of WokingWoking Unknown website
Surrey Epsom and Ewell https://getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/local/epsom-epsom-and-ewell
Surrey Mole Valley https://maps.molevalley.gov.uk/?tab=maps
Surrey Reigate and Banstead Unknown website
Surrey Surrey Heath http://surreymaps.surreycc.gov.uk/public/viewer.asp
Surrey Tandridge DistrictTandridge Unknown website
Tyne and Wear City of SunderlandSunderland Unknown website
Tyne and Wear Metropolitan Borough of GatesheadGateshead Unknown website
Tyne and Wear Newcastle upon Tyne https://community.newcastle.gov.uk/mapping/prowmap-mapUnknowntop
Tyne and Wear North Tyneside Unknown website
Tyne and Wear North Warwickshire http://maps.warwickshire.gov.uk/rightsofway/
Tyne and Wear South Tyneside Unknown website
Warwickshire (all districts covered) {{official websitehttp://maps.warwickshire.gov.uk/rightsofway/}}
Warwickshire Borough of RugbyRugby Unknown website
Warwickshire Nuneaton and Bedworth https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/
Warwickshire Stratford-on-Avon DistrictStratford-on-Avon http://maps.warwickshire.gov.uk/rightsofway/
Warwickshire Warwick DistrictWarwick Unknown website
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Birmingham http://www.birminghamramblers.org.uk/index.php?page=onlinemap
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Coventry https://www.coventry-walks.org.uk/maps/set-of-maps.htm
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Metropolitan Borough of DudleyDudley https://mapping.dudley.gov.uk/custom/urban-and-rural-paths.asp
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Metropolitan Borough of SolihullSolihull http://www.solihull.gov.uk/Portals/0/LeisureParksEvents/Cycling_and_Walking_foldout_map.pdf
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Metropolitan Borough of WalsallWalsall Unknown website
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Sandwell Unknown website
West Midlands (county)West Midlands Wolverhampton Unknown website
West Sussex Adur DistrictAdur https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/maps/general-map/
West Sussex Arun DistrictArun https://www1.arun.gov.uk/webapps/wml/Map.aspx?MapName=StrategicSites
West Sussex Chichester DistrictChichester https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/chichester-eng/
West Sussex Crawley https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/crawley-eng/
West Sussex Horsham DistrictHorsham https://www.francisfrith.com/horsham/map-of-horsham-1940_npo740790
West Sussex Mid Sussex https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/land-waste-and-housing/public-paths-and-the-countryside/public-rights-of-way/public-rights-of-way-imap/imap/
West Sussex Worthing Unknown website
West Yorkshire Calderdale https://www.calderdale.gov.uk/v2/maps
West Yorkshire City of BradfordBradford https://cbmdc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=96f405cabeff443f820ac0c7df8fd658
West Yorkshire City of LeedsLeeds https://www.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=fef90bd138bf48e19e3076a81366d3d3
West Yorkshire City of WakefieldWakefield Unknown website
West Yorkshire Kirklees http://maps.kirklees.gov.uk/PublicRightsofWay/map.aspx
Wiltshire Borough of SwindonSwindon https://www.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=43d5a86a545046b2b59fd7dd49d89d22
Wiltshire Wiltshire (district)Wiltshire http://wiltscouncil.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappvieweindex.html?id=43d5a86a545046b2b59fd7dd49d89d22
Worcestershire Bromsgrove DistrictBromsgrove https://www.mapmywalk.com/gb/bromsgrove-eng/
Worcestershire Malvern Hills DistrictMalvern Hills https://gis.worcestershire.gov.uk/website/Countryside/
Worcestershire Redditch Unknown website
Worcestershire Worcester https://gis.worcestershire.gov.uk/website/Countryside/
Worcestershire Wychavon Unknown website
Worcestershire Wyre Forest DistrictWyre Forest Unknown website
Edit - alphabetised.
submitted by hikerrambler21 to UKhiking [link] [comments]


2019.08.09 12:02 leeeroyjenkins323 Unfair Ultimatum by Employer

Hi, I'll try and be brief and too the point so please ignore the grammar.
I joined the business in January. Contract states once successful completion of probation salary increases from £35k to £40k. 15th July meeting with manager and confirmed passed probation verbally in a meeting. I requested letter from HR and no response. 24th July MD calls me in with marketing director, and tells me teams not doing well no salary increase. Marketing director praises my activity during this meeting. My sales manager assured me on 15th targets were got and performance was good. 31st July HR sends letter confirming passing probation. 8th August MD calls me into office no heads up. No offer of HR present or representative. Tells me "the initial plan was to make you redundant and then offer you the same job with a lower salary and start probation again, but because HR sent the letter cannot do that now. The HR person who sent the letter was instructed to not give you a letter passing for this reason and we are not happy with her. Now you have 2 choices, we have to honour your contract and increase the salary but we will take away your residential and demand lead projects as the initial contracted stated your role was to bring in business customers only, this will reduce the revenue brought in and make you miss target, which we will have to address with disciplinary action. OR we will give you a new contract with £35k salary and allow the residential and demand lead projects to count towards the target and you will be on 6 months probation."
Also
When joining the business in 2 interviews I was told I would be based in Oxfordshire (I live on borderline) when I started day 1 I was told I am working in Shropshire region as the business is awaiting to win a tender for Oxford. I would not of taken the role as Shropshire is 2.5 hours from me. I was promised data and training, none provided and have email trail with me outlining my concerns for lack of training.
Please can you assist.
submitted by leeeroyjenkins323 to LegalAdviceUK [link] [comments]


2019.08.05 13:41 Amber_Rudd #GEXII [Shropshire and Staffordshire] Amber_Rudd’s Listening Tour Commences

Taking a leaf out of Hillary Clinton’s 2000 New York Senate Campaign, Amber_Rudd has organised a listening tour across Shropshire and Staffordshire with the tour commencing at the University of Staffordshire’s Law School. The purpose of the listening tour is to open a dialogue with groups across the constituency about how we can improve the constituency, and country, to allow us to move forward together. The purpose of today’s visit is to gather the thoughts of the students on the proposals in the Conservative manifesto concerning a second digital competition bill and further reworks to contract law including the banning of no-poach agreements and location exclusivity clauses. After a brief introduction of Amber_Rudd by a Politics student at the University, the candidate commences the event.
”Thank you all for being here, I am really hoping we can open a constructive dialogue on what you would want me to improve if I were elected. Some of you will have seen some of the key proposals we’ve put in the manifesto chief among them the rework of contract law and strengthening of digital competition law. If you haven’t I’m happy to give you a copy of the manifesto that we all worked so hard on at the end, just stay behind and see me we have enough copies for everyone. Some of you will know that I worked as a University Lecturer before entering politics so I will really do my best to not lecture you all for the next few hours because today isn’t about me, it’s about listening to your ideas on what we can do to help. Do we have any brave volunteers who want to tell me about what their idea is for our second Digital Competition Bill?”
”Hi Amber_Rudd thanks for being with us. My name’s Adam and I am President of the University of Staffordshire Conservatives. I wouldn’t normally say this, but given you have invited us here for a dialogue I guess we really ought to have some sort of debate about the merits of the issue. All I’ll say is that I’m not sure about the merits of the proposal to strengthen digital competition again, to me it seems like it’s been strengthened enough and that the Digital Competition Act went a bit too far on regulating companies for my liking. Don’t get me wrong, I believe in competitive markets but it just seems a step too far. ”Can I just say thank you for asking the question, and for your work with the Staffordshire Conservatives I know you all played a big role in helping to make this visit possible. I take it your idea for our second Digital Competition Bill is that we shouldn’t have one?”
”Pretty much yeah”
”Well Adam, I respect your opinion but I really do politely disagree. One of our fundamental values as Conservatives is about ensuring people succeed based on talent and for businesses based on who can appeal most to the consumer. Imagine if getting into University was dependent not on your grades or academic aptitude but on whatever UCAS thought of you as a person. That wouldn’t be fair and it wouldn’t be meritocratic, I happen to think we need to apply this same rationale to our largest technology companies. I like you am always hesitant towards regulation. Regulation has the power to be remarkably destructive and stifle competition, that’s what it’s done in the University sector with UCAS being a defacto monopoly that has wildly misused your data. That being said regulation can at times play a positive role when it adds to competition and I think you digital competition act does that. Even though you oppose it ensuring we listen to you in its drafting is still important, do you have anything else you’d like to say?”
”I won’t take up anymore time”
”Okay your turn”
”Hi, I’m Amanda and I’m a third year law student here and I can’t say I’ve been following the campaign much but here’s my idea. I think you need to make it so that the people launching these anti-trust cases are held to high standards about any conflicts of interest they themselves have. I also think it’d be good if the Secretary of State was made to be more pro-active in launching these anti-trust cases for us all.”
”Fantastic ideas Amanda, absolutely fantastic. In the second Digital Competition bill, I’ll make sure to add a provision adding new tougher standards on transparency in. We definitely cannot have the vested interests of the regulator standing in the way of eliminating the vested interests of maintaining monopolies. I completely agree with you on the more pro-active role the Secretary of State needs to take in breaking up monopolistic companies, not only will I add a provision into the second Digital Competition bill ensuring they have to report to Parliament about what they’re doing at least once a year but I’ll write another bill make the Secretary of State more responsible for launching anti-trust cases. I’d love to hear any other ideas you have.”
Amber_Rudd continues to discuss competition policy and contract law with the students for the rest of the day as the first part of the listening tour.
submitted by Amber_Rudd to MHoCCampaigning [link] [comments]


2019.05.16 20:49 CalClimate Quotes

Quotes on climate science, climate policy, clean energy, and what you can do that matters the most. (This 'quotes' page melds into the 'Background' page, boundaries are not distinct.)
On children and climate:
"Our house is still on fire. Your inaction is fueling the flames by the hour. And we are telling you to act as if you loved your children above all else." (g.t., 2020)
"Adults need to stop talking to kids about climate change, and do something about it". (source, age 11)
"[Almost 30 years ago] the IPCC projected future CO₂ levels and warned of potential global warming. in that time, we've cut [only] <5 ppm from that 1992 [business as usual] scenario." (slightly mangled quote; link, with graph)
"more and more [children] understand that when it comes to doing what it takes to avoid future hell-on-Earth scenarios, adults are, on the whole, failing them." (source)
“By failing to address climate change in a meaningful way, we are failing our children, and they know it.” (source)
[Globally(?)] "we have 10 years to do a 55% emissions reduction to have a 50% chance of a +1.5C world" (S.G., source)
"One could view climate change as [the outcome of] a massive spending spree, the end result of humanity spending down its 600-million-year inheritance." (*)
A strategy for what we can do to solve climate change: "taking over the biggest government in the world and making it work to solve this problem." (T.S., source)
For the U.S. government, "If it's not job one, it won't get done" (J.I., source)
Also, about the IPCC 'land' report:
"Climate change requires us to alter the biogeochemical organism that we call the global economy on the fly, in our lifetimes. Such a task should command most of the time and attention of every economist, agriculturalist, investor, executive, and politician—anyone who fancies themselves a leader in the physical workings of the economy."
Quotes on the big picture:
  • "The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing" - Stephen Covey (link)
  • "The climate crisis is the issue to which all the others must somehow bend." (source)
  • "The climate emergency is not an issue, it's an era, and we're only at the beginning of it." (source)
  • "Winning slowly is the same thing as losing." (source; quoted at 9:30 by G.T. here)
  • "We may be the children of this country, but we’re also its parents." (via)
  • "There are no born heroes in this world; only ordinary people who stand up and step forward." (source)
  • "My growing fear is that we will spend so much money on climate adaptation that we won't have any left for mitigation..." (source)
To some:
  • "People listen to you. They are influenced by you. And therefore you have an enormous responsibility. ..." (source, 3:00)
Quotes on climate Science
  • "The climate system is an angry beast, and we are poking it with sticks"
  • "a good analogy? We are as certain that humans are responsible for recent climate change as we are that cigarettes are dangerous to your health." (source)
  • "Some people complain that this is the hottest summer in the last 125 years, but I like to think of it as the coolest summer of the next 125 years!" (source)
  • "Within a few generations ... [humanity] is burning the fossil fuels that slowly accumulated in the earth over the past 500 million years" (climate scientist to president, 1965)
  • Longevity of effects:
    • "“Irreversible on human timescales” is a phrase that ought to spring to mind whenever we hear someone claiming they have a plan to “reverse climate change.”" (source)
    • "about 3/4 of the CO2 will go away in a few centuries, but the rest will remain in the atmosphere for thousands of years" - david archer (source, graph (via)
    • "If you keep emitting CO2 for another ten years, CO2 levels in the atmosphere will increase further for another ten years, and then stay higher for centuries to come. " (source); “The amount of carbon we pump out in the next 50 or 100 years is going to determine what climate humanity will have to live with for essentially most of the [assumed half-million year] rest of the lifetime of our species.” - Raymond Pierrehumbert, 2012, AGU talk
  • Quantity (of emissions, of heat, ...)
    • "There is still no sign of a peak in global emissions" (source) / "We haven’t even succeeded in reversing direction yet. ... Global carbon emissions...were up 1.7 percent in 2018". (source) (the 1st src says 2%)
    • "More than half of all the carbon emissions ever produced in the entire history of humanity have been produced in Taylor Swift’s lifetime." (source)
    • "If you burn a lump of coal, the greenhouse effect from the carbon dioxide released from burning that coal will, over its lifetime in the atmosphere, heat the Earth about 100,000 times more than the thermal energy released from burning that coal." (source, source)
    • "RCP8.5 emissions [trajectory] are not 'business-as-usual' [emissions ('8.5' is worse), ] BUT it's important to note that in Earth System models, the RCP8.5 CO2 concentration pathway can still arise from a lower emissions scenario (eg. SRES A1B) if feedbacks are strong." (source)
  • Sea level:
    • at "a time in which the Earth was two to three degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial era -- sea level was as much as 16 meters higher than the present day." (source (Mallorcan cave))
    • "Because of the Moon's climate, Neil Armstrong's footprint will be there for thousands of years. Because of the Earth's climate, which we are changing fast by burning fossil fuels, both the Johnson & Kennedy space centers are likely to be gone in a century ([from] rising seas)." - (source)
  • In the end, we have two choices: 1, Burn all the carbon because of short-term profit. 2, Leave the carbon in the ground and/or reinsert it into minerals after burning it. The key parameter of the problem is not "How much will we emit before 2100?" The key parameter of the problem is "How much will we emit?" (source)
  • "the only important period of time [in the past temperature record] is the last 10,000 years during which human civilization developed." (source)
  • "A global climate 10 degrees warmer than present is not remotely the same thing as taking the current climate and simply adding 10 degrees everywhere. This is an admittedly widespread misconception, but arguably quite a dangerous one." (source)
  • "When you find places that have experienced [extreme climate change] – and we have – then you learn something else. You learn what every other place will have to prepare for in the future." (source)
  • "The science [of climate disruption] doesn’t mainly speak of ‘great opportunities to create the society we always wanted’. It tells of unspoken human sufferings, which will get worse and worse the longer we delay action..." (source)
Quotes about inactivism and climate complacency
  • "the argumentation about "end of civilization" not resulting from climate change seems narrow. The question is how humanity responds to climate change. It's fairly easy to cause the end of civilization through thermonuclear war, so any increase in tension is unwelcome." (source)
  • "One of the grim realities of climate politics today is that the elites bankrolling climate-denier politicians have made a simple calculation. They aren’t betting that the scientific consensus is wrong. They are betting that the impacts of climate change won’t fall directly on them." (source)
Quotes on Science
  • "it is NOT science's job to persuade, and it's a very grave and consequential category error to think otherwise." (source)
  • "Uncivilized people try to "win" debates. Civilized people try to resolve them. Debate is not a sport." (source)
  • "The purpose of scientific debate is to arrive at the truth. The purpose of political debate is to use such truth as is available to arrive at a workable compromise that solves problems while minimizing injury to those affected by the solution." (source)
Quotes on finance, cost of climate action, capitalism, the economy, how to make money from investing
  • "I can't help you make money in the oil and gas stocks anymore. They seem like a slowly melting ice cube, a wasting asset."— ⁦@jimcramer (source)
  • "Stopping climate change is only expensive compared to an imaginary world where climate change doesn't exist. It's incredibly cheap compared to the actual cost of a 3 degree [C] warmer world." (source)
  • "while those risks and costs [from climate inaction] will fall almost entirely on the younger two-thirds of the population (and future generations), the money from climate destruction is being mostly accumulated by the older third." (source)
  • "'Degrowth' is "the abstinence education of climate policy"" (via)
Quotes on climate communication by scientists:
  • "How will history judge us if we watch the threat unfold..but fail to communicate urgency of acting to avert potential disaster? How would I explain to future children of my 8-year-old daughter that grandfather saw the threat, but didn’t speak up in time? Those are the stakes." (source)
  • "“What’s the use of having developed a science well enough to make predictions if, in the end, all we’re willing to do is stand around and wait for them to come true?” ― F. Sherwood Rowland (source)
  • "If there’s an asteroid hurtling toward the Earth, you want the relevant experts to let us know." (JK, source)
  • "It's very hard dealing with pain and suffering one on one. ... But the suffering that will result from our profession's failure to explain our understanding of our planetary circumstances is far greater than any individual worker sees up close [today]." (source)
  • "If scientists choose not to engage in the public debate, we leave a vacuum that will be filled by those whose agenda is one of short-term self-interest..." (source: nyt)
re the "structural" communications problem of the citizenry wanting to know how to solve climate change, but scientists not being climate policy analysts - "there isn't really a logical home for delivering credible, carefully assessed, accurate information about how we can respond to climate change productively." (video clip)
Quotes on climate Policy: (policies) have moved to the 'Quotes on climate policies' page, for size reasons.
Quotes on...
  • Efficiency vs Electrification
    • "you can't 'efficiency' your way to zero carbon" (griffith, ezrakleinshow (12:40))
  • Adaptation vs. mitigation: (coping with climate change, vs. preventing it)
    • "The cost of adaptation will be immense. $119B for a sea wall around NY will cost every American $300. This addresses just one problem (sea level rise) in one locale (NY).... This [the cost of adaptation] is going to bankrupt us." (thread)
    • "mitigation spending is more egalitarian, more just — everyone on Earth benefits from it — whereas adaptation spending is inevitably local and skewed to those with more wealth and resources." (source)
  • Adaptation:
    • "Adaptation without mitigation is futile." (source)
      • "adaptation alone — building ever-higher walls to keep out the sea and simply turning up the air-conditioning as the outdoors becomes uninhabitable — won’t save us." (source)
      • "climate adaptation is just going to be so expensive and heartbreaking. People are going to fight with each other every step of the way - clawing for safety, and their own preferences among only-bad choices in a world of limited resources." (source)
      • "the majority of the world population cannot adapt to #ClimateChange" (link)
      • "If we try to adapt to a moving target, what we're doing... is just wasting our money" - Gavin Schmidt *
      • “Trying to adapt to the consequences of climate change while continuing to burn fossil fuels is like trying to mop up an overflowing sink while the taps are still running.” (source)
      • "in our rapidly warming, rapidly changing world[,] sea walls and levees will never be high enough or strong enough" (source)
    • "Adaptation measures [which are] responding to (acceptably moderate) projections of change in order to maintain the status quo is not a strategy, it’s a PR play." (source)
Quotes on miscellany:
  • "Calling out BS is not censorship." (source)
  • "Good intentions may not necessarily translate to good policies" (source)
  • "People who avoid plastic straws don't understand how big the world is. People who think humans can't change the Earth's atmosphere don't understand how small the world is." (source) (or rather, how thin the atmosphere is)
  • "Disruption is inevitable. We get to choose the ratio -- disruptions wrought by climate change vs. disruptions wrought by aggressive climate policy -- but that's it. Placid maintenance of the status quo is not an option." (source)
  • “I got enamored with the notion that I was driving on sunshine. As soon as you take that step, ....” (link)
  • (re 'electrify everything'): "As long as we are reducing carbon on [aka 'cleaning up'] the grid, every single electrical device is getting cleaner throughout its life." (source)
  • "until we mine, manufacture and drive on low carbon energy, EVERY car [still] emits a lot of CO2." (source)
  • On dangerous or otherwise misguided policies, or misguided views: (see also the 'Policies' FAQ and policies quotes)
    • Geoengineering - "the idea of “fixing” the climate by hacking the Earth’s reflection of sunlight is wildly, utterly, howlingly barking mad." (source)
    • "the claim that we can "buy time" to reduce emissions by committing to the future deployment of some combination of as-yet-untested sequestration strategies is...dangerously naive" (source)
    • "Globally, subsidies to fossil fuels were up 11 percent between 2016 and 2017, reaching $300 billion a year"; while "Total investment in renewable energy (not including hydropower) was [down, to] $288.9 billion in 2018 — less than fossil fuel subsidies and an 11 percent decrease from 2017." (source)
  • "The ice caps don't care about systems of oppression..." (source)
Quotes on the need (& potential) for a transition to clean energy and electrification:
  • " Climate change is shaping up to be the biggest catastrophe in human history, and it demands not wishful thinking, but a clear-eyed view of reality and human nature." (source)
  • "This is more like retooling for World War II, except with everyone playing on the same team." - reportedly Saul Griffith of @otherlab
  • "When Franklin D Roosevelt said we would build a historic air force of 185,000 planes to defeat the Nazis, we barely had an airlines industry. We were producing only about 3,000 planes a year. We didn’t know if we could do it, but we knew we had to try. By the end of the second world war, we had produced more than 324,000 military aircraft (in less than five years)." (link) (20+ times faster than prewar)
  • "Anyone who doubts the technological arc of electric cars, look at the arc of cellphones in your own life"; "the most important renewable energy is the power of perseverance" (source, 32m & 34:30)
  • "As long as we are reducing carbon on the grid, every single electrical device is getting cleaner throughout its life." (source)
  • "growth rates [of wind and solar installation] up until now are largely irrelevant. The whole point of growing renewables has been to drive down their cost...What matters is that policies up until now have driven down the cost of solar, wind, and energy storage by more than an order of magnitude...[If] renewables ...drop another factor of 2 or 3 in price – on top of the factor of 10 or more that they’ve fallen already, then we’ll enter a new domain where renewable growth rates aren’t determined by fickle policy. Instead, they’ll be limited only by the pace at which renewables can be deployed. ... " (source) - "solar and wind power had to drop by a factor of nearly 10 in price – from 60 cents / kwh for new electricity to roughly 6 cents / kwh for new electricity – to move from their early days to being competitive for new power. But they only have to drop by another factor of 2 or 3 to move from being competitive for new power to being cheaper than the operating cost of existing coal and gas."
  • ""We know that sustainable energy is the end point. So why are we doing this experiment [of burning fossil fuels]? It's an insane experiment. It's the dumbest experiment in human history." - elon musk. (and a little more from that interview)
  • "Don't cling to a mistake just because you spent a lot of time making it."
  • "[For Republicans:] If we really decided to commit the nation in all its might to solving this problem, do you not believe that American ingenuity and American industry could get the job done? " (source)
  • .
Quotes on prioritizing various climate actions
  • "people should prove that we can actually get the CO2 emissions down first, before worrying about whether we are doing enough to get methane emissions down.”" (source)
  • "There isn’t time to convince everyone to adopt a low carbon lifestyle. This implies that intense pressure must remain on regulatory and technical progress." (source) (keyword footprintism)
Quotes on psychology
  • "Actual useful research in persuasion is not coming from academic sources. The real experts in persuasion are the people with a million percent as much data and zero per cent as many regulatory constraints on how to collect and use it." (source)
  • What can motivate climate delayers & deniers: "When your sole definition of who you are is the position you hold, then you will do anything not to lose that sense of who you are.” (source)
Quotes on delaying climate action, and climate delayers
  • On "complexity" - "...."There's plenty of complexity for those of you who like complexity. But we now know, to a fair degree of certainty, that if we keep doing what we're now doing, we will face unthinkable catastrophe... That's the take-home message. (source)
  • "Be suspicious of anyone who argues we should plant a lot of trees, but oppose mandates or taxes to accelerate decarbonization. " (source)
  • Why humanity delays: the fossil fuel industry benefits from delay, it keeps making money. As for human voters: "...we fear the solutions more than we fear the impacts." (source)
  • "1/6 of North Americans are locked in a culture war with physics, and vow to go down fighting." (source)
  • "you can care about it now when you can still do something about it or you can care about it later when you can't." (source)
  • "We look like we're going to hell in a handcart, but, we don't have to. And that is our choice..." - K.Anderson, podcast, at about 21:00
  • "There is no wall high enough to keep out the consequences of inaction on emissions." (source)
  • "climate defeatism is obedience to power." (source) (climate nihilism)
  • "a lot of environmental groups were under the impression that the Republican Party is a creature of business, and that if you can make business allies, you can get Republicans to do something." (source, via); "people...who think about problems scientifically...[have trouble believing] that the climate issue is ideologically polarizing." I softened this quote some, in line with my preferences. Is that legit.?
  • " 2-3 degrees doesn’t feel as dire if you’re used to Fahrenheit." (*)
  • "As Ray Pierrehumbert once told me, it's never too late to do something as long as there's a pound of coal left in the ground that we can choose not to burn." (source)
Quotes on What you can do / Activism
  • "It may be that... the thing we're going to be remembered for will boil down to where we were on this issue" (source)
  • on individual 'footprint' action vs. systemic action:
    • "We need systemic changes that will reduce everyone’s carbon footprint, whether or not they care." (source) (see also the "there isn't time..." quote; keyword footprintism)
    • "... People building cleaner more renewable energy need to drive cars, ride on planes, and heat their houses with gas, because that is what's available to them. Participating in the world as it is does not disqualify you from trying to improve it." (source?)
    • On individual changes -
      • "if only everybody just" arguments have zero merit." (*); "Except when it comes to voting, and then it just takes [over half]"
      • "If everyone does a little, we’ll achieve only a little." (source) (" This “if-everyone” multiplying machine is just a way of making something small sound big. ... it deflects people’s attention towards 25 million minnows instead of ...sharks.")
      • "the actual changes themselves are only there as a catalyst for conversation with others, to try and drive that change more widely...ultimately what we have to deliver, is system level change." - KA (source) (Babbage, Climate Change, 9/18/2019, at about 24:00)
      • "I’m not traveling like this because I want everyone to do so, I’m doing this to send a message that it is impossible to live sustainably today & that needs to change. It needs to become much easier." (Greta Thunberg, source)
      • "social scientists estimate that getting 3 or 4 percent of people involved in a movement is often enough to force systemic change, whereas if they acted solely as consumers that same number would have relatively little effect." (source)
      • "Big oil wants to talk about your carbon footprint [and stay quiet on the forces acting to keep humanity fossil-fuel-addicted or the pathways that work, to move off it to clean energy]" (*)
      • "Demands for individual action paralyse people, thereby preventing the large-scale change we so urgently need. " - "All we need is to create a consensus within society that we should not destroy our home and demand that governments make this their first priority." (source) ( On the (misguided) exhortations to limit your GHG 'footprint' as being the way that you should fight climate change, keep in mind this (link) (individuals' GHG emissions amount to only like 20% of emissions) (calculated for Finland)(does this include consumption?))
      • "In midst of an irreversibly destabilized global climate sometime in the future, will I have a good answer when my son/daughter (or niece/nephew/grandchild) asks, "What did you do about climate change when there was still time to solve the problem?" Personally, I don't want to say, "I recycled and bought a hybrid." " (source) ( "I want to say, 'I voted. I petitioned. I canvassed. I protested. I called my elected official. I tried to raise awareness about the severity of the issue.'" )
    • "Our greatest responsibility is to be good ancestors."-Jonas Salk
    • but - “The answer is not to strive for greater individual perfection, but to ask: who benefits from climate inaction? Whose status is maintained by political inertia? Whose structures render personal efforts insufficient? Take the fight back to politics, where it belongs.” (source) “The idea that ‘the personal is political’ has always made demands that were exceptionally hard to live by. It has become an injunction that until you are living perfectly, according to the values you espouse, you are a hypocrite and an irrelevance.”
    • "My strategy to solve climate change is taking over the biggest government in the world and making it work to solve climate change." (source)
  • "You don't need to understand any climate science beyond these two facts: 1) fossil CO2 accumulates in the environment, 2) the more there is, the worse the future will be. If you understand that, you are qualified to be active about the issue." (source, and thread)
  • [For young engineers:] "there are many ways of contributing toward innovation in the production of clean energy without going off and building [something of heft like] a fusion reactor. Look at the stuff around the things..." (source: what a technologist can do about climate change)
  • (One thing: talk about it.) "a major new study led by Yale researchers finds that just discussing the [climate change] issue with friends and family leads them to learn more facts about the climate crisis, which in turn leads to greater understanding and concern about the issue." (source )
    • But - "Like using reusable containers or recycling or carpooling, talking about climate change can be [just] an individual action. But it will make a much bigger difference if talking about climate isn’t solely an individual action, and if instead institutions work to foster that dialogue." (source)
  • .
Quotes on Urbanism & Transportation have been moved to the 'What cities can do' page) due to hitting size limits on this main 'Quotes' page.
Misc; including quotes on stepping up to the plate
  • “Do you want to give a better world to your children, or a catastrophe?” (source)
  • "Our stewardship of this planet shouldn’t be a partisan matter.” (source)
  • "The way I would prefer to envision climate change is as a major national challenge that we rose to as a national project, and led the world in dealing with, and stood taller because we did it." (source)
  • "We should be scared of the status quo, not [of] climate solutions." (source)
  • "Climate change isn’t an on-off switch. It’s a dial. Our action will determine how bad it will get." (source) (true, unless we hit tipping points)
  • "The climate emergency is not an ancient curse, it's a recent choice." (source) (with graph)
  • "If the average American had the carbon emissions of the average EU citizen, the country’s emissions would fall by 60%." (source) (U.S., presumably.); "The American electricity grid loses two-thirds of all energy produced as waste heat.[and] We discard something like 50% or 60% of all of our food."
  • "What I saw going to [climate] conferences was how hard it really is to get [not just] leaders, but really including most people on this planet, to act in a way that’s going to restrict their own growth, their own desire to use energy." (source: bryan walsh)
  • On the carbon cycle - 'Trees come out of the air' - Feynman
  • "the future with solutions is not scarcity, it is abundance" (source) - this is one view, and, we need to aim for that. But on the other hand, there's this 'big lifestyle changes needed' view. (But on the third hand, "'For every hour you spend cycling, you add one hour to your expected healthy lifespan. For every hour you sit in a car, you subtract an hour.'" (source, (via)) - some very appealing 'lifestyle' images here
The 'Metaphors' section has moved.(link)
submitted by CalClimate to ActOnClimate [link] [comments]


2018.10.07 22:22 YosemitySam Broken Billboard Article

Top 40 Duets Of All Time
One big name on a red-hot hit is great, but sometimes two superstar voices come together in an inspired pairing that is truly special. With Valentine\'s Day\'s celebration of couples in mind, our experts dove into over 50 years of Hot 100 hits to single out the biggest songs by two singers to ever hit the chart. So grab a box of chocolates, dim the lights, cozy up to that special someone and turn up the speakers as we count down the hottest duets of all time.

Top 50 \'Love\' Songs of All Time
PHOTOS: Pop Star Hookups \& Breakups
20 Best Love Songs By Real Couples 30 Biggest Break-Up Songs
This chart is comprised only of songs where two singers share equal vocal duties on the track. Ranking is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100 since the chart launched in August 1958. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least.

Text by Keith Caulfield, M. Tye Comer, Mariel Concepcion, Jessica Letkemann, Jason Lipshutz, Jillian Mapes and Chart Beat Columnist Gary Trust

How This Chart Was Created: The 40 Biggest Duets of All-Time list includes songs that feature two singers sharing equal vocal duties on the track. Ranking is based on actual performance on the weekly Billboard Hot 100 since the chart launched in August 1958. Songs are ranked based on an inverse point system, with weeks at No. 1 earning the greatest value and weeks at No. 100 earning the least. Prior to the Hot 100\'s implementation in 1991 of enhanced radio and sales information from Nielsen BDS and Nielsen SoundScan, songs had shorter reigns at No. 1 and shorter chart lives. To ensure equitable representation of the biggest hits from the past 52 years, earlier time frames were each weighted to account for the difference between turnover rates from those decades and the turnover rates that have occurred since the advent of Nielsen Music data.

40. The Closer I Get To You
Roberta Flack with Donny Hathaway
1978
Just months before Donny Hathaway\'s untimely death, this tender tune for Hathaway and Roberta Flack was a No. 2 hit on the Hot 100 in 1978, but it wasn\'t the first star turn for a song by the pair. Their 1973 duet \"Where Is The Love\" won them a Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo Or Group. \"The Closer I Get,\" meanwhile, has gone on to be covered by no less than Beyonce dueting with Luther Vandross in 2003.

39. I Just Can\'t Stop Loving You
Michael Jackson With Siedah Garrett
1987
Michael Jackson is that rare artist that can score on the charts alone, in a group, duetting with another male superstar (for example with Paul McCartney on \"Say Say Say\" and \"The Girl Is Mine\"), and, as was the case with this love ballad, pairing his lilting tones with a female singer. \"I Just Can\'t Stop Loving You,\" which found the King Of Pop trading emotional verses with Siedah Garrett, rose to the top of the Hot 100 in Sept. 1987.

38 . I\'m Your Angel
R. Kelly \& Celine Dion
1998
And the award for oddest pairing goes to\… R. Kelly and Celine Dion, who came together for the duet \"I\'m Your Angel,\" written by Kelly and featured in Dion\'s \"These Are Special Times\" album. Released in 1998, the single reached No. 1 on the Billboard 100 chart and remained there for six weeks.

37. Wild Night
John Mellencamp With Me\'Shell Ndegeocello
1994
The \"Wild Night\" in question seems to have been entirely platonic in this case. There\'s clearly no chemistry between Mellencamp and Ndegeocello in the video, but the two sure have a jammin\' ol\' time on the track. This version of the song, originally by Van Morrison, spent two weeks at No. 3 on the Hot 100 chart the fall of 1994.

36. The Next Time I Fall
Peter Cetera with Amy Grant
1986
Is it possible to fall in love with the same person twice? Peter Cetera and Amy Grant (oh, and songwriter Bobby Caldwell) seem to think so. On the popular song \"The Next Time I Fall,\" which appears on Cetera\'s 1986 album \"Solitude/Solitaire,\" Cetera and Grant harmonize about falling in love all over again with the same lover. Sweet!

35. I Got You Babe
Sonny \& Cher
1965
Iconic \'60-\'70s husband and wife duo Sonny \& Cher had several hits during their career, but none came to define the pair quite like \"I Got You Babe.\" The track spent three weeks atop of Hot 100 in 1965. In addition to wooing couples across the globe, the hit grew to become an easy going love ballad for the hippie generation.

34. All I Have
Jennifer Lopez \& LL Cool J
2003
Based on a sample from Debra Laws\' 1981 song \"Very Special,\" \"All I Have,\" finds J. Lo and LL Cool J talking about a couple that\'s on the verge of calling it quits. Still, while the tune is about splitsville, Jenny from the block and Mr. James manage to separate in style and grace (See Jennifer\'s Louis Vuittons and Gucci bags?).

33. No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)
Barbra Streisand / Donna Summer
1979
For those weathering a breakup, two of the biggest divas of all-time are here to declare that \"enough is enough.\" Donna Summer commiserates with Barbra Streisand over the sad state of dealing with relationships before musically saying \"Screw it! Let\'s dance!\" to a thumping disco beat. It is a truly glorious moment to listen to the singers bust out of their slumps -- and apparently all of America thought so as well, as the song stayed at No. 1 on the Hot 100 for two weeks in 1979.

32. The Girl Is Mine
Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney
1982
Many things are unlikely about the MJ-Macca pairing: that \"The Girl Is Mine\" was actually the lead single off \"Thriller,\" that Jackson would later buy the rights to Beatles songs behind McCartney\'s back, but most of all, that the two mega-stars would ever fight over a woman. But after having a ball recording McCartney\'s \"Say Say Say\" together in 1981, Jackson and his Beatle friend gave it another go with the cheesy, soft-rock duet. \"The Girl Is Mine\" peaked at No. 2 on the Hot 100, and stayed there for three weeks -- probably because we were all surprised to see the two superstars singing together.

31. I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)
Aretha Franklin \& George Michael
1987
Considering what we know now, the pairing of Aretha Franklin and George Michael on the uptempo duet \"I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)\" seems a little less strange. After all, every sassy diva needs her gay BFF. But regardless of the head-scratching over its duo of performers, \"I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)\" spent two weeks atop the Hot 100 chart in 1987 as well as 17 weeks total.

30. Friends And Lovers
Carl Anderson \& Gloria Loring
1986
While \"Friends and Lovers\" sounds undoubtedly dated, the airy duet between unlikely pairing of actors/singers Carl Anderson and Gloria Loring was all the rage in \'86. After a popular performance on the soap opera \"Days Of Our Lives\" -- on which Loring starred as lounge singer Liz Chandler -- the song spent two weeks at No. 2 on the Hot 100 chart. For those hoping to move out of the dreaded \"friends zone,\" Anderson and Loring have some encouragement that it\'s actually possible: \"We don\'t have to be one or the other.\"

29. Up Where We Belong
Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes
1982
\"Up Where We Belong\" may be synonymous with the 1982 film \"An Officer and a Gentleman,\" but the Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes duet is just as romantic even when one is not staring at a super-dreamy uniformed Richard Gere. The song not only stayed at No. 1 on the Hot 100 for three weeks in late 1982 -- it also won both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe for Best Original Song for a film in 1983. What we wouldn\'t give for smokey-voiced Joe Cocker to serenade us with nonsense tales of eagles crying, all while being whisked away from our awful factory jobs!

28. Stop Draggin\' My Heart Around
Stevie Nicks With Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers
1981
Although Stevie Nicks\' debut album, \"Bella Donna,\" featured more timeless singles like \"Edge of Seventeen\" and \"Leather and Lace,\" the Tom Petty collaboration \"Stop Draggin\' my Heart Around\" was the world\'s first glimpse of the Fleetwood Mac singer as a solo artist. Produced by Petty and Jimmy Iovine, the rock track was even parodied by \"Weird Al\" Yankovic with the song \"Stop Draggin\' My Car Around.\"

27. No Air
Jordin Sparks with Chris Brown
2008
Between the more self-affirming singles \"Tattoo\" and \"One Step at a Time,\" Jordin Sparks released this lilting duet with R\&B star Chris Brown. A Grammy nominee for Best Pop Collaboration with vocals, \"No Air\" reached No. 3 on the Hot 100 and served as a precursor to Sparks\' emotionally wounded future single, \"Battlefield.\"

26. (I\'ve Had) The Time Of My Life
Bill Medley \& Jennifer Warnes
1987
The Black Eyed Peas recently used the hook of Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes\' duet for their single \"The Time (Dirty Bit),\" but the words \"I\'ve had the time of my life\" will forever be tied to the 1987 film \"Dirty Dancing.\" The soft-rock hit closed out the Patrick Swayze-Jennifer Grey flick and won the 1987 Academy Award for Best Original Song.

25. Easy Lover
Philip Bailey \& Phil Collins
1984
Phil Bailey, the longtime member of Earth, Wind \& Fire, and former Genesis drummer Phil Collins came together for this 80s pop confection off Bailey\'s 1984 album \"Chinese Wall.\" Although the track was Bailey\'s biggest hit by far, Collins scored again the following year with \"Separate Lives,\" his duet with Marilyn Martin.

24. You\'re The One That I Want
John Travolta \& Olivia Newton-John
1978
The peppy collaboration between \"Grease\" stars Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta hit No. 1 on the Hot 100 in June 1978. \"You\'re The One That I Want,\" along with the actors\' other duet \"Summer Nights,\" helped the soundtrack to the hit 1978 film become certified eight-times platinum, according to the RIAA.

23. Baby, Come To Me
Patti Austin \& James Ingram
1982
It\'s one the greatest baby-making jams of all time, but \"Baby Come to Me\" was far from an immediate hit. When the Patti Austin \& James Ingram duet was first released in 1982, it only made it to no. 73 on the Hot 100. But later that year, the track gained new exposure through its use on ABC soap opera \"General Hospital.\" In response to the newfound buzz, the song was re-released and climbed to No. 1 on both the Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts in early 1983.

22. Nobody
Keith Sweat \& Athena Cage
1996
Keith Sweat, the king of new jack soul, conjured up an intense quiet storm when he teamed up with soulful chanteuse Athena Cage for this steamy R\&B jam in 1996. The pair soared to no. 3 on the Hot 100, and sizzled at the top of the R\&B chart for three hot weeks.

21. You Don\'t Have To Be A Star (To Be In My Show)
Marilyn McCoo \& Billy Davis, Jr.
1976
Marilyn McCoo and Billy David Jr. didn\'t have to struggle to find their chemistry in the studio. Not only had the pair been married for seven years when they recorded this 1976 R\&B classic, they\'d already spent a decade making beautiful music together as part of \'70s soul quintet The 5th Dimension. The pair\'s romantic and musical bond paid off -- the Grammy-winning track went to No. 1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 and Hot Soul Singles chart.

20. You Don\'t Bring Me Flowers
Barbra Streisand \& Neil Diamond
1978
Some duets exude their magic even though their singers recorded their tracks separately. That was not only the case with this song, but it was never intended to be a duet to begin with. Diamond released his version months before Streisand\'s. It wasn\'t, however, until inventive WAKY Louisville, Ky., programmer Gary Guthrie created a mixed edit that audiences heard the now-classic dual version. Columbia then released the song with both superstars. In just six chart weeks, it became the third Hot 100 No. 1 for each.

19. Don\'t Know Much
Linda Ronstadt feat. Aaron Neville
1989
Though Ronstadt racked eight Hot 100 top 10s between 1975 and 1980, she didn\'t reappear in the top tier until 1987 with the James Ingram duet \"Somewhere Out There\" (No. 2), from \"An American Tail.\" The ballad subsequently won the 1988 song of the year Grammy Award. For her next album, \"Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind,\" Ronstadt included four duets with Neville. This first single not only reached No. 2 on the Hot 100, but it also topped Adult Contemporary for five weeks and won the 1990 Grammy for best pop performance by a duo or group with vocal.

18. Somethin\' Stupid
Nancy Sinatra \& Frank Sinatra
1967
The legendary Frank Sinatra claimed his final Billboard Hot 100 top 10 hit -- and second No. 1 -- thanks to an unlikely duet with his daughter Nancy Sinatra. The latter already had some hits under her belt -- including the No. 1 \"These Boots Are Made For Walkin\'\" in 1966 -- so the \"Stupid\" pairing wasn\'t simply a riding-the-coattails moment for the Chairman\'s daughter. It is the only father-daughter duet to reach the top of the Hot 100, where it spent four weeks at the top.

17. The Way I Are
Timbaland \& Keri Hilson
2007
Super producer Timbaland called in a bunch of friends for his 2007 \"Shock Value\" album, including the rising star Keri Hilson, who guests on \"The Way I Are.\" Though the track didn\'t hit No. 1, it did peak at No. 3 -- for four non-consecutive weeks -- and linger on the list for a healthy 38 weeks. \"Way\" was one of four Hot 100 hits from \"Shock Value\" -- Timbo also claimed entries with \"Give It To Me\" (No. 1 for two weeks), \"Release\" (No. 91) and \"Apologize\" (No. 2).

16. Opposites Attract
Paula Abdul with The Wild Pair
1988
Yes, duets with cartoon cats count. The song is perhaps best remembered for its video featuring the animated MC Skat Kat, voiced by the track\'s featured act, the Wild Pair. \"Opposites Attract\" became the fourth and final Hot 100 No. 1 from Abdul\'s debut album, \"Forever Your Girl,\" following \"Straight Up,\" the title cut and \"Cold Hearted.\" A year later, Mariah Carey banked her fourth leader from her eponymous debut set, but no other artists in the chart\'s history have accomplished such out-of-the-gate domination.

15. Empire State of Mind
Jay-Z + Alicia Keys
2009
It\'s an Empire State Building-tall order to create a Big Apple anthem when there\'s already Frank Sinatra\'s \"New York, New York\" (and Billy Joel\'s \"New York State of Mind\"). All the more impressive, then, that Jay-Z and Keys ruled the Hot 100 for five weeks with their modern Gotham theme. A Keys solo piano version reached No. 55 and the \"Glee\" cast opened its second season by performing its rendition, in honor of this year\'s nationals show choir finals taking place in the \"concrete jungle where dreams are made, oh.\" (It peaked at No. 21). Our (biased) favorite line from the song? Jay-Z\'s astute observation, \"now I live on Billboard\"!

14. Promiscuous
Nelly Furtado \& Timbaland
2006
Suggesting that \"Promiscuous\" was a jarring change of pace for Nelly Furtado would be an understatement. As the lead single from her Timbaland-produced \"Loose\" album in 2006, the sexy, thumpy number was a far cry from the more earnest, quirky singles of her first two albums -- including \"I\'m Like a Bird\" and \"Turn Off The Light.\" But sexy clearly worked, as the cheeky \"Promiscuous\" tune spent eight weeks lodged in the No. 1 slot. It was the first of two toppers from \"Loose\" -- she later returned with \"Say It Right.\"

13. Reunited
Peaches \& Herb
1979
The only good thing about breaking up is that it opens the door for making up -- a topic that R\&B duo Peaches \& Herb explored in their 1979 hit \"Reunited.\" The slow-burning jam became a crossover smash, topping both the Hot 100 and R\&B Singles charts. The song has also inspired several cover versions, including one by rock band Faith No More, who performed it during their 2009-10 reunion tour, and German star David Hasselhoff, who sung it at the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

12. Separate Lives
Phil Collins and Marilyn Martin
1985
Before there was \"Black Swan,\" the \'80s gave us the elegant dance film \"White Nights,\" starring Russian ballet icon Mikhail Baryshnikov, as well as Gregory Hines, Helen Mirren and Isabella Rossellini. The movie is also remembered for its hit soundtrack, which yielded two Hot 100 No. 1s: Lionel Richie\'s Oscar-winning \"Say You, Say Me\" and this intimate ballad, written by Stephen Bishop (\"It Might Be You\"). The song became Martin\'s only topper and the fourth of Collins\' seven solo leaders.

11. On My Own
Patti LaBelle \& Michael McDonald
1986
While as the leaders of their respective groups Labelle and the Doobie Brothers, LaBelle and McDonald earned No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 singles, neither had a solo topper until this 1986 duet. Interestingly, the two singers hadn\'t met until well after the song was recorded and was scaling the chart -- as the single was put together on different coasts in different studios. As Fred Bronson notes in his \"Billboard Book of Number One Hits,\" \"As \'On My Own\' went to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, LaBelle and McDonald met for the first time -- at NBC Studios in Burbank (Calif.), where they performed the song on \'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.\'\"

10. Don\'t Go Breaking My Heart
Elton John \& Kiki Dee
1976
John has recorded so many hit duets he even released an album entitled \"Duets,\" which peaked at No. 25 on the Billboard 200 in 1993. Following his classic pairing with Dee, Elton graced the Hot 100 with the likes of Aretha Franklin, George Michael (their \"Don\'t Let the Sun Go Down on Me\" hit No. 1 in 1992), LeAnn Rimes and RuPaul(!), whose dance remake of this song, from \"Duets,\" dented the chart (No. 92) in 1994. John\'s current album? The collaborative \"The Union,\" with Leon Russell, which stands as John\'s top-charting set (No. 3) on the Billboard 200 since 1976.

9. Islands In The Stream
Kenny Rogers with Dolly Parton
1983
Some 30 years ago, star power didn\'t shine much brighter than that of Rogers and Parton, who charted a combined 22 No. 1s on Country Songs in the \'80s. Add that this song was written by the Bee Gees and it\'s no surprise that it topped the Hot 100 for two weeks, as well as Country Songs and Adult Contemporary. In 1998, Pras Michel borrowed its melody for the chorus of \"Ghetto Supastar (That Is What You Are).\" The reinvention, featuring Ol\' Dirty Bastard and Mya, hit No. 15 on the Hot 100 and No. 8 on R\&B/Hip-Hop Songs.

8. Baby Boy
Beyonce \& Sean Paul
2003
Whether on her own (\"Irreplaceable,\" \"Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)\"); in pairings (\"Beautiful Liar,\" with Shakira, \"Telephone,\" with Lady Gaga); or, in the trio Destiny\'s Child (\"Bills, Bills, Bills,\" \"Say My Name\"), Beyonce = Hot 100 hit-making. This duet marked the second of her five No. 1s since 2003 as a solo artist, following four toppers in Destiny\'s Child in 1999-2001. Paul capped the Hot 100 once before this leader, with \"Get Busy\" (three weeks, 2003), and once after, with \"Temperature\" (one week, 2006).

7. My Boo
Usher and Alicia Keys
2004
Not to be confused with the 1996 hit of the same name by Ghost Town DJs, this ode to having a boyfriend or girlfriend \"that will always have your heart\" was tailor made for success because of the team of R\&B superstars behind it. Not only does the track find Keys\' golden tones mingling with Ushers, the was the track co-written by Keys, Usher and Jermaine Dupri with Manuel Seal and Adonis Shropshire. Little wonder, then, that it rocketed to No. 1 and stayed there for six weeks.

6. I\'m Real
Jennifer Lopez \& Ja Rule
2001
Here\'s another of the four songs that J.Lo, with assistance from Ja Rule, took to No. 1 on the Hot 100 before she joined the judges panel on TV\'s No. 1-rated show, \"American Idol.\" Complementing her new night job, Lopez (previously at No. 36 on this ranking) has recently released the single \"On the Floor,\" featuring Pitbull. The track marks her first appearance on Billboard\'s Dance Airplay chart (where it debuted last week at No. 23) since 2007.

5. Dilemma
Nelly \& Kelly Rowland
2002
If you\'re a member of any group where there is someone who is ostensibly the lead singer -- and you aren\'t them -- it isn\'t easy to break out on your own. So for Destiny\'s Child\'s Kelly Rowland, her first single away from the group was an event. An event that could either turn into a footnote or a smash. And what a smash it was. Her \"Dilemma\" duet with Nelly notched a stunning 10-week run at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, cementing Rowland as not just a backing vocalist to Beyonce, but a solo star in her own right.

4. Ebony And Ivory
Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder
1982
Recorded for Paul McCartney\'s \"Tug Of War\" album, the duet -- which spent seven weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100 -- is the longest-running solo No. 1 for either McCartney or his duet partner Stevie Wonder. \"Ebony and Ivory\" works as a sort of ultimate \"can\'t we get along?\" song, with the lyric: \"Ebony and ivory live together in perfect harmony / side by side on my piano keyboard, oh lord why don\'t we?\"

3. The Boy Is Mine
Brandy \& Monica
1998
This 1998 duet had all the makings of a smash single. First, it paired up rising then-teen female R\&B stars Brandy and Monica -- each of whom had notched four top 10 Billboard Hot 100 hits on their own, but not yet a No. 1. Second, there were rumors swirling that the two ladies weren\'t exactly on friendly terms. Third, the lyrical content of the song was all about fighting over a man -- perfect fodder for alleged rivals to sing about. The result? A No. 1 that lasted for 13 weeks at the top -- at the time, one of only seven singles in the chart\'s history to spend that long at No. 1.

2. Say Say Say
Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson
1983
Just seeing the words \"Michael Jackson\" and \"Paul McCartney\" placed next to each other would have sent chills up any music fan\'s spine back in 1983, when \"Say, Say, Say\" was released. The super duo\'s hit spent six weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100 and was the second of two duets from the pair, following \"The Girl Is Mine\" (No. 2 on Jan. 8, 1983). The stars drifted apart after 1985, when Jackson purchased the massive ATV catalog of songs (which included the majority of the Beatles\' catalog). McCartney was later cool to Jackson, but after the latter\'s passing in 2009, he issued a statement about the King of Pop: \"I feel privileged to have hung out and worked with Michael. He was a massively talented boy man with a gentle soul. His music will be remembered forever and my memories of our time together will be happy ones.\"

1. Endless Love
Diana Ross \& Lionel Richie
1981
Diana Ross \& Lionel Richie\'s \"Endless Love\" crowns our list of the top duets of all time -- and with good reason. It\'s not only the biggest No. 1 hit for either artist (it spent nine weeks at the top), but also clung to the chart for an amazing 27 weeks -- a lengthy run for a single back in 1981. Richie wrote the music and lyrics for the soundtrack tune from the Brooke Shields movie of the same name, and recruited diva Ross to accompany him on the song. \"Endless\" almost returned to the Hot 100 perch nearly 13 years later, when Luther Vandross and Mariah Carey\'s cover stalled at No. 2 on Oct. 1, 1994.

Top 50 \'Love\' Songs of All Time
PHOTOS: Pop Star Hookups \& Breakups
20 Best Love Songs By Real Couples 30 Biggest Break-Up Songs

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2018.10.05 13:26 EvenRecognition Bookmarks - 4

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2018.10.05 13:23 EvenRecognition Bookmarks - 4

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2017.10.27 19:55 googolplexbyte Addressing the problems with "[MISLEADING] Why The Tories Won So Many Seats In the 2017 General Election" using your feedback.

So I spent the day going back over this post, fixing the issues you pointed out.
You are right that boundaries being in CON's favour now do not means proposed boundary changes would hurt the Conservatives. But my intended message was that Conservatives were comfortable with the current boundaries and they have no urgency to tip things further in their favour.
I consider myself right-leaning, this isn't some targeted attack against the Conservatives. I would prefer as small a bias as possible leaning towards being in the Conservatives favour.
My goal was to just see if there was any indication that some counties were split into constituencies in a way that leads to more wasted votes for one party over another, out of mere idle curiosity.
You are right that analysing just 2017 is insufficient evidence, so I did an analysis of the Efficiency Gap for each of the last 6 General Elections;
County '97 '01 '05 '10 '15 '17 '05 Size '10 Size
Northamptonshire -27.3% -28.9% 15.3% 21.2% 17.4% 28.4% 6 7
Shropshire -7.2% -20.3% 22.2% 0.0% 17.4% 27.6% 5 5
Buckinghamshire 2.4% 0.9% 7.0% 8.7% 7.7% 26.8% 7 6
Cornwall -40.6% -43.5% -33.5% -24.3% 5.3% 26.8% 5 6
Hertfordshire 1.6% -0.2% 14.4% 10.0% 9.8% 24.8% 11 11
Dyfed -7.9% -11.6% 6.4% 16.9% 15.5% 22.2% 5 5
West Sussex 10.6% 11.8% 5.7% 2.9% -2.6% 17.3% 8 8
Hereford and Worcester -6.2% -4.2% -10.9% 15.1% 6.0% 16.4% 8 8
Essex 5.5% 6.0% 8.8% 7.5% 3.8% 16.2% 17 18
Wiltshire 1.9% 2.2% -4.9% 3.3% 3.2% 15.6% 6 7
Kent -3.8% -5.2% -7.9% 13.3% 10.6% 15.4% 17 17
North Yorkshire -8.3% -14.1% -2.9% 5.3% 2.5% 14.6% 8 8
Norfolk 4.0% 3.8% -2.4% 8.1% 4.2% 12.6% 8 9
Leicestershire 9.4% 6.8% 1.8% 7.4% 5.0% 12.6% 10 10
Isle of Wight -44.1% 23.7% 11.3% 7.1% 5.7% 11.9% 1 1
Dorset 26.2% -0.1% -2.4% -0.4% -3.9% 11.6% 8 8
Warwickshire -25.3% -26.7% -12.0% 29.3% 19.6% 10.3% 5 6
Suffolk 21.6% 21.3% 8.7% 19.4% 13.7% 9.0% 7 7
Staffordshire -3.0% -7.9% -17.4% 9.0% 1.5% 8.9% 12 12
Merseyside 2.8% -0.5% -5.6% -1.4% 6.0% 8.8% 16 15
Powys -8.4% -29.7% -40.1% -23.9% 6.6% 8.3% 2 2
Somerset -8.4% -1.0% -21.3% -54.3% -2.7% 6.3% 5 5
Devon -6.8% -17.0% -13.4% -12.4% 1.0% 6.2% 11 12
Scotland -3.1% 0.8% -0.5% -0.7% 24.1% 6.0% 72 59
Lancashire -19.2% -23.6% -19.3% 6.3% 0.8% 5.5% 15 16
Avon -22.8% -20.8% -16.6% 5.1% 4.8% 5.5% 10 11
Cambridgeshire 11.3% 10.5% 23.9% 7.3% 3.7% 5.4% 7 7
Hampshire 5.8% 3.6% -3.8% -8.9% -3.5% 5.0% 17 18
Surrey 19.9% 13.5% 9.4% -5.5% -12.1% 4.2% 11 11
Nottinghamshire -11.4% -8.5% -12.7% -7.0% -3.3% 3.7% 11 11
London -8.9% -6.7% -3.2% -3.7% -1.7% 3.3% 74 73
Oxfordshire 17.8% 17.2% 4.8% -2.4% -2.8% 2.7% 6 6
Gloucestershire -21.7% -23.0% -12.2% 13.4% 14.1% 2.6% 6 6
Humberside 6.5% 2.4% -1.9% 1.9% 3.3% 1.3% 10 10
Derbyshire -13.2% -12.5% -18.1% 4.6% 12.4% 1.0% 10 11
Berkshire -12.0% -5.8% 5.5% -2.2% -4.2% 0.2% 8 8
Lincolnshire 28.6% 24.6% 15.5% 8.6% 8.7% -0.3% 7 7
East Sussex -19.7% -18.2% -22.8% 4.9% 5.8% -1.5% 8 8
Northumberland 21.1% 13.2% 5.5% -10.6% 1.5% -3.3% 4 4
Bedfordshire 6.1% 6.2% -4.1% -1.9% -2.0% -3.6% 6 6
South Glamorgan -18.2% -22.8% -22.6% 9.5% 7.4% -5.8% 5 5
Gwynedd 26.2% -3.5% 3.9% -12.9% -13.2% -6.1% 3 3
Cumbria -3.1% -14.7% -27.2% -21.7% -23.1% -6.7% 6 6
West Midlands -7.8% -8.8% -15.3% -14.0% -10.1% -6.8% 28 28
West Yorkshire -19.6% -23.6% -18.7% -3.6% 2.3% -7.3% 23 22
Greater Manchester -2.5% -6.5% -8.0% -19.2% -3.2% -8.2% 28 27
Gwent and Mid Glamorgan 13.0% 3.5% 10.8% -6.7% -7.2% -9.3% 13 13
Cheshire -4.1% 0.0% -8.0% 13.6% 6.2% -12.6% 11 11
Tyne and Wear 8.5% 4.6% -3.8% -14.7% -6.9% -13.9% 13 12
Cleveland -2.8% -7.5% -10.1% -3.2% -7.4% -14.9% 5 6
West Glamorgan 13.8% 5.9% -1.1% -15.4% 10.8% -16.2% 5 5
Clwyd -18.5% -22.5% -12.8% -22.2% -8.4% -18.3% 7 7
South Yorkshire 8.6% 2.6% -1.1% -16.2% -2.4% -19.2% 15 14
Durham 3.7% -4.0% -4.1% -17.9% -19.2% -28.6% 8 7
Each county with an Efficiency Gap greater than 8% indicates a significantly larger share of wasted votes for Labour than Conservative, Each lesser than 8% the reverse, and otherwise no significant favour towards either;
Favour '97 '01 '05 Sum '10 '15 '17 Sum
CON Favour 14 8 10 32 14 12 21 47
LAB Favour 18 19 21 58 15 6 9 30
No Favour 22 27 23 72 25 36 24 85
Now, none of this implies Gerrymandering despite a marked change in favour after the boundary changes from their '97-'05 status to their current.
The Efficiency Gap is just a measure of wasted votes, not a test for Gerrymandering. A large Efficiency Gap is just a flag suggesting further investigation.
You are right that we should be suspicious that the favour aligns with periods of more votes for a party with more wasted votes for a party.
So I analysed share of wasted votes for Labour vs Conservative, compared to the share of votes for Labour vs Conservative for each county over each year and plotted it on this Chart:
Image form
Interactive form
At the county level, there is a very weak correlation between more votes and fewer wasted votes suggesting the Efficiency Gap cannot be explained by the success of one party over another.
You are right that we should be suspicious of results involving constituencies where 3rd parties performed well.
So I have re-analysed all six elections to factor out those results:
County '97 '01 '05 '10 '15 '17 '05 Size '10 Size
Northamptonshire -27.7% -29.3% 14.9% 21.5% 17.4% 29.0% 4 5
Shropshire -6.8% -20.6% 22.6% -1.1% 17.2% 28.4% 3 4
Buckinghamshire 2.5% 0.7% 7.2% 9.6% 8.1% 28.3% 4 4
Cornwall -40.5% -43.4% -32.7% -21.5% 5.4% 29.2% 3 3
Hertfordshire 2.0% -0.2% 14.0% 9.3% 9.5% 24.9% 7 7
Dyfed -7.9% -11.9% 6.1% 21.8% 18.4% 26.4% 3 3
West Sussex 11.2% 11.9% 5.2% 4.3% -2.7% 18.4% 5 5
Hereford and Worcester -6.0% -5.0% -11.8% 16.7% 6.2% 17.2% 5 5
Essex 5.7% 5.9% 8.6% 9.4% 3.5% 15.6% 10 11
Wiltshire 2.4% 2.6% -5.7% 8.7% 3.7% 17.6% 4 5
Kent -3.3% -5.2% -8.8% 14.4% 9.9% 16.1% 10 11
North Yorkshire -8.2% -14.6% -2.6% 4.9% 2.3% 14.9% 5 5
Norfolk 5.3% 3.5% -2.4% 12.0% 5.3% 15.9% 5 6
Leicestershire 10.5% 7.3% 1.5% 7.8% 4.9% 12.4% 6 7
Isle of Wight -44.1% 23.7% 11.3% 7.1% 5.7% 11.9% 1 1
Dorset 26.5% -0.1% -2.1% 2.7% -3.5% 13.1% 5 5
Warwickshire -25.8% -26.9% -12.2% 31.7% 19.3% 11.1% 3 4
Suffolk 23.4% 21.8% 8.5% 21.3% 14.1% 8.4% 5 5
Staffordshire -2.7% -8.0% -18.0% 9.5% 2.4% 9.1% 7 8
Merseyside 1.2% -1.2% -6.4% 0.3% 6.1% 8.0% 9 11
Powys -8.4% -29.4% -40.1% -20.8% 6.7% 8.1% 2 1
Somerset -7.7% -0.7% -20.9% -46.4% -3.2% 7.1% 3 3
Devon -6.2% -17.1% -13.7% -11.9% 0.0% 5.0% 7 7
Scotland -3.9% 0.4% -1.0% -0.2% 20.7% 5.5% 39 23
Lancashire -19.3% -23.9% -19.5% 5.3% 1.1% 5.5% 9 11
Avon -23.5% -20.9% -16.2% 9.7% 5.5% 6.1% 6 7
Cambridgeshire 12.0% 10.3% 24.1% 8.1% 5.1% 4.1% 4 4
Hampshire 6.1% 4.4% -3.8% -8.2% -4.0% 6.2% 10 11
Surrey 20.1% 13.5% 9.6% -5.6% -12.3% 4.8% 7 7
Nottinghamshire -11.7% -8.3% -13.0% -6.4% -2.1% 3.5% 7 8
London -9.2% -6.8% -3.3% -2.8% -2.0% 3.7% 42 48
Oxfordshire 18.3% 17.5% 4.5% -2.9% -3.4% 6.8% 4 4
Gloucestershire -21.6% -23.2% -12.7% 20.6% 15.8% 1.7% 4 4
Humberside 7.4% 3.1% -1.8% 3.0% 3.8% 1.4% 6 7
Derbyshire -13.1% -12.7% -18.7% 6.9% 13.0% 1.8% 6 8
Berkshire -12.2% -5.5% 5.8% -2.7% -3.4% -0.1% 5 5
Lincolnshire 29.3% 24.9% 15.4% 8.3% 9.3% -0.9% 4 5
East Sussex -20.2% -18.1% -23.6% 13.6% 4.2% 0.5% 5 5
Northumberland 22.3% 13.6% 6.0% -8.7% 2.0% -5.1% 3 3
Bedfordshire 7.3% 6.8% -5.0% -2.6% -1.5% -4.0% 4 4
South Glamorgan -18.2% -23.1% -23.0% 10.3% 9.9% -6.0% 3 4
Gwynedd 26.0% -4.7% 3.1% -14.5% -16.8% -9.0% 2 2
Cumbria -2.3% -14.7% -27.4% -18.8% -19.5% -2.5% 4 4
West Midlands -7.7% -8.9% -15.6% -14.1% -9.9% -7.3% 16 19
West Yorkshire -20.7% -24.1% -19.0% -4.3% 3.2% -7.4% 13 15
Greater Manchester -2.6% -6.6% -8.1% -19.2% -2.6% -9.6% 16 17
Gwent and Mid Glamorgan 11.4% 2.4% 9.8% -5.8% -7.1% -10.4% 7 8
Cheshire -3.0% 0.2% -8.6% 12.9% 6.3% -13.5% 7 8
Tyne and Wear 8.0% 4.3% -4.1% -14.9% -7.3% -14.0% 7 8
Cleveland -3.2% -7.7% -10.1% -5.3% -5.4% -14.4% 3 4
West Glamorgan 12.5% 5.0% -1.9% -14.2% 11.8% -17.1% 3 4
Clwyd -19.6% -22.8% -12.3% -22.3% -7.0% -20.5% 4 5
South Yorkshire 8.1% 2.4% -1.2% -15.9% -3.0% -19.0% 8 9
Durham 2.9% -4.5% -4.7% -17.3% -19.4% -29.3% 5 5
Favour '97 '01 '05 Sum '10 '15 '17 Sum
CON Favour 14 8 10 32 19 14 21 54
LAB Favour 17 20 22 59 15 5 10 30
No Favour 23 26 22 71 20 35 23 78
The above result suggests the Efficiency Gap still persists even with a focus on seats dominated by Labour & Conservatives.
I hope this is sufficiently rigorous for you to assess who the current boundaries favour. But I think no matter what your conclusion is it's clear there is an issue with wasted votes with our current FPTP system.
I apologise for my earlier attempt and welcome further feedback regarding other changes I can make to further improve my presentation of this data.
If you feel this is sufficient evidence of the harmful nature of wasted votes I would greatly appreciate it if you signed or shared this petition proposing an alteration to FPTP that would eliminate wasted votes.
submitted by googolplexbyte to ukpolitics [link] [comments]


2017.10.27 09:57 googolplexbyte Why The Tories Won So Many Seats In the 2017 General Election

Gerrymandering has been in the US News lately. Specifically, a measure of Gerrymandering called the Efficiency Gap that is being presented to the US Supreme Court.
The Efficiency Gap looks at the wasted votes across a county and compares the difference in wasted votes between two parties as a percentage of their total votes.
The Efficiency Gap regards a vote as wasted if it's not cast for the winning candidate, or if it is cast in excess of what the winning candidate needed.
So I decided to take the voting data for the 2017 General Election and calculate the Efficiency Gap for each county.
County Name LAB Votes CON Votes LAB Waste CON Waste Efficiency Gap
Northamptonshire 130836 203088 130836 36118 28.4%
Shropshire 90824 143376 90824 26270 27.6%
Buckinghamshire 118554 190171 118554 35801 26.8%
Cornwall 83968 152428 83968 20726 26.8%
Hertfordshire 193820 327740 193820 64283 24.8%
Dyfed 76453 65702 60896 29339 22.2%
West Sussex 130656 257464 130656 63394 17.3%
Hereford and Worcester 119459 240506 119459 60514 16.4%
Essex 261671 528949 261671 133619 16.2%
Wiltshire 102818 213442 102818 53542 15.6%
Kent 282296 503068 256816 135844 15.4%
North Yorkshire 151532 240629 126224 68889 14.6%
Norfolk 156248 246380 132734 82035 12.6%
Leicestershire 213141 259803 147916 88543 12.6%
Isle of Wight 17121 38190 17121 10533 11.9%
Dorset 103274 240121 103274 63453 11.6%
Warwickshire 107083 167372 82458 54763 10.1%
Suffolk 126190 221019 102372 71223 09.0%
Staffordshire 210791 313321 154451 107588 08.9%
Merseyside 514266 154856 196772 137771 08.8%
Powys 12877 38156 12877 8659 08.3%
Somerset 51897 164532 51897 38267 06.3%
Devon 188379 331828 138219 105828 06.2%
Scotland 717007 757949 596083 507792 06.0%
Lancashire 361850 337794 194153 155647 05.5%
Avon 245617 257070 143225 115704 05.5%
Cambridgeshire 138135 203492 92784 74402 05.4%
Hampshire 248571 528803 209298 170372 05.0%
Surrey 131311 362809 131311 110592 04.2%
Nottinghamshire 265073 242451 136249 117500 03.7%
London 2086595 1268885 908365 796562 03.3%
Oxfordshire 104812 172709 81335 73926 02.7%
Gloucestershire 99260 182875 69608 62133 02.6%
Humberside 184463 212940 101983 96706 01.3%
Derbyshire 240408 263537 128417 123543 01.0%
Berkshire 147763 242350 96871 95965 00.2%
Lincolnshire 105177 227103 82612 83519 -00.3%
East Sussex 145236 199786 93901 99236 -01.5%
Northumberland 74232 76899 35296 40264 -03.3%
Bedfordshire 136304 163239 69558 80206 -03.6%
South Glamorgan 131192 84597 47699 60190 -05.8%
Gwynedd 33343 23835 20328 23835 -06.1%
Cumbria 99100 133296 57255 72782 -06.7%
West Midlands 646938 491911 245786 323603 -06.8%
West Yorkshire 584018 414015 211327 284114 -07.3%
Greater Manchester 719372 411694 231926 324611 -08.2%
Gwent and M. Glamorgan 276530 145987 84509 123678 -09.3%
Cheshire 278044 263922 101456 169514 -12.6%
Tyne and Wear 326641 153268 86671 153268 -13.9%
Cleveland 142025 102434 42922 79300 -14.9%
West Glamorgan 111687 55260 28207 55260 -16.2%
Clwyd 129272 115302 38821 83457 -18.3%
South Yorkshire 356899 186515 82077 186515 -19.2%
Durham 166840 108012 29406 108012 -28.6%
Quick and dirty heatmap form
A positive efficiency gap means proportionally more Labour votes are wasted, and a negative means proportionally more Conservative votes are wasted.
In the US Supreme Court case, anything in excess of 8% is being argued as Gerrymandered at the county level. So by those standards, the UK would be considered as having 9 counties Gerrymandered in Labour's favour, and 21 counties in Conservative's favour.
Technical Guff;
Caveats, NI is not included as there are no Labour votes to compare to, and the Buckingham constituency is not included in the Buckinghamshire county. Please understand this is only a measure, not a test. It is also a measure best suited for constituencies where Labour or Conservatives dominate. Third parties add some uncertainty to determining the number needed to win, for the above 50% of Top2 votes + 1 is used as number needed to win, which assumes minimal impact from 3rd parties (See comment for dynamic and maximum 3rd party impact table). At most, the 3rd party impact reduces the number of Gerrymander seats to 20, accounting for the proportion of 3rd parties in a county suggests 24, and strategic voting likely means the actual number lies between 30 and 24. 
~
If you're concerned with the Efficiency Gap in your county; write to your MP, sign this petition that proposes a change to our FPTP system that would eliminate wasted votes, and/or ask your MP to sign the petition. If you actually want to change anything, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
submitted by googolplexbyte to unitedkingdom [link] [comments]


2017.10.27 08:56 googolplexbyte Why The Tories Won So Many Seats In the 2017 General Election

Gerrymandering has been in the US News lately. Specifically, a measure of Gerrymandering called the Efficiency Gap that is being presented to the US Supreme Court.
The Efficiency Gap looks at the wasted votes across a county and compares the difference in wasted votes between two parties as a percentage of their total votes.
The Efficiency Gap regards a vote as wasted if it's not cast for the winning candidate, or if it is cast in excess of what the winning candidate needed.
So I decided to take the voting data for the 2017 General Election and calculate the Efficiency Gap for each county.
County Name LAB Votes CON Votes LAB Waste CON Waste Efficiency Gap
Northamptonshire 130836 203088 130836 36118 28.4%
Shropshire 90824 143376 90824 26270 27.6%
Buckinghamshire 118554 190171 118554 35801 26.8%
Cornwall 83968 152428 83968 20726 26.8%
Hertfordshire 193820 327740 193820 64283 24.8%
Dyfed 76453 65702 60896 29339 22.2%
West Sussex 130656 257464 130656 63394 17.3%
Hereford and Worcester 119459 240506 119459 60514 16.4%
Essex 261671 528949 261671 133619 16.2%
Wiltshire 102818 213442 102818 53542 15.6%
Kent 282296 503068 256816 135844 15.4%
North Yorkshire 151532 240629 126224 68889 14.6%
Norfolk 156248 246380 132734 82035 12.6%
Leicestershire 213141 259803 147916 88543 12.6%
Isle of Wight 17121 38190 17121 10533 11.9%
Dorset 103274 240121 103274 63453 11.6%
Warwickshire 107083 167372 82458 54763 10.1%
Suffolk 126190 221019 102372 71223 09.0%
Staffordshire 210791 313321 154451 107588 08.9%
Merseyside 514266 154856 196772 137771 08.8%
Powys 12877 38156 12877 8659 08.3%
Somerset 51897 164532 51897 38267 06.3%
Devon 188379 331828 138219 105828 06.2%
Scotland 717007 757949 596083 507792 06.0%
Lancashire 361850 337794 194153 155647 05.5%
Avon 245617 257070 143225 115704 05.5%
Cambridgeshire 138135 203492 92784 74402 05.4%
Hampshire 248571 528803 209298 170372 05.0%
Surrey 131311 362809 131311 110592 04.2%
Nottinghamshire 265073 242451 136249 117500 03.7%
London 2086595 1268885 908365 796562 03.3%
Oxfordshire 104812 172709 81335 73926 02.7%
Gloucestershire 99260 182875 69608 62133 02.6%
Humberside 184463 212940 101983 96706 01.3%
Derbyshire 240408 263537 128417 123543 01.0%
Berkshire 147763 242350 96871 95965 00.2%
Lincolnshire 105177 227103 82612 83519 -00.3%
East Sussex 145236 199786 93901 99236 -01.5%
Northumberland 74232 76899 35296 40264 -03.3%
Bedfordshire 136304 163239 69558 80206 -03.6%
South Glamorgan 131192 84597 47699 60190 -05.8%
Gwynedd 33343 23835 20328 23835 -06.1%
Cumbria 99100 133296 57255 72782 -06.7%
West Midlands 646938 491911 245786 323603 -06.8%
West Yorkshire 584018 414015 211327 284114 -07.3%
Greater Manchester 719372 411694 231926 324611 -08.2%
Gwent and M. Glamorgan 276530 145987 84509 123678 -09.3%
Cheshire 278044 263922 101456 169514 -12.6%
Tyne and Wear 326641 153268 86671 153268 -13.9%
Cleveland 142025 102434 42922 79300 -14.9%
West Glamorgan 111687 55260 28207 55260 -16.2%
Clwyd 129272 115302 38821 83457 -18.3%
South Yorkshire 356899 186515 82077 186515 -19.2%
Durham 166840 108012 29406 108012 -28.6%
Quick and dirty heatmap form
A positive efficiency gap means proportionally more Labour votes are wasted, and a negative means proportionally more Conservative votes are wasted.
In the US Supreme Court case, anything in excess of 8% is being argued as Gerrymandered at the county level. So by those standards, the UK would be considered as having 9 counties Gerrymandered in Labour's favour, and 21 counties in Conservative's favour.
Technical Guff;
Caveats, NI is not included as there are no Labour votes to compare to, and the Buckingham constituency is not included in the Buckinghamshire county. Please understand this is only a measure, not a test. It is also a measure best suited for constituencies where Labour or Conservatives dominate. Third parties add some uncertainty to determining the number needed to win, for the above 50% of Top2 votes + 1 is used as number needed to win, which assumes minimal impact from 3rd parties (See comment for dynamic and maximum 3rd party impact table). At most, the 3rd party impact reduces the number of Gerrymander seats to 20, accounting for the proportion of 3rd parties in a county suggests 24, and strategic voting likely means the actual number lies between 30 and 24. 
~
If you're concerned with the Efficiency Gap in your county; write to your MP, sign this petition that proposes a change to our FPTP system that would eliminate wasted votes, and/or ask your MP to sign the petition. If you actually want to change anything, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
submitted by googolplexbyte to ukpolitics [link] [comments]


2017.07.21 15:47 AJs_WP_Acct [SECRET] Fun with friends!

Thanks to our friends in Washington and Switzerland, the MoD has worked out multiple agreements of international cooperation which make a spree of new projects possible. It is hoped that these efforts help assure the UK's continued defence capabilities.
[M] This is all in one post to avoid spam. I will roll for secrecy and success of each project separately in the comments. The auto-roll coming from making this post will go towards the first item on this list, the bomber. All of these are intended to be secret projects except for the last one with Geneva.

It's a bird, it's a plane, wait, yes it's definitely a plane

[M] Secret to USA, Canada, Australia if roll works out.
Following discussions with the United States of America, along with the Commonwealths of Canada and Australia, we're going to take another go at trying to make that bomber that didn't work out a few years ago. This time, we've got American help, so it should be alright.
The bomber itself will be a replacement to the B-21 Raider in American service, and since we're Brits and the last time we fielded a proper bomber was during the War, it'll replace the Avro Lancaster in our own air force. For Canada and Australia's military use, it will replace the angrier specimens of their wildlife. We're sure the Canadians will be glad they no longer need to weaponise geese, same for the Ozzies on drop bears. Introducing, the B-27 Bandit.
The bomber itself will integrate the effective subsonic heavy stealth bomber platform of its predecessor with a lot of the advanced aerospace technology developed for the F-203 air superiority fighter. It will use the F-203's upgraded AN/APG-81, the F-203's upgraded AN/ASQ-37 DAS, the F-203's upgraded AN/ALQ-94, and the F-203's upgraded AN/ASQ-242. All of these technologies will be adapted for deployment on the bomber, and for bomber use as opposed to ASF use - a greater focus on ground scanning and communicating with other surveillance assets in the battle network, as opposed to hunting down enemy aircraft. Additionally, for British, Canadian, and Australian models, GPS guidance will be replaced by NEWTON guidance. This four-way project will cost $28 billion, and be ready in January 2059, as it is largely a refinement of the B-21 Raider design coupled with adaption of existing technologies.

B-27 Bandit

Specifications Statistic
Length 21 m
Wingspan 54 m
Height 4,8 m
Empty Weight 71,000 kg
Max Takeoff Weight 177,500 kg
Max Speed Mach 0,95
Cruise Speed Mach 0,85
Range 20,000 km
Service Ceiling 17,500 m
Internal Payload Capacity 30,000 kg
Equipment Statistic
Laser Countermeasures 2 x 6 MW Free Electron Lasers
Primary Ground Search Radar Northrop Grumman AN/APG-87 AESA, adapted to bomber focus
DAS Northrop Grumman AN/AAQ-39 Distributed Aperture System and Lockheed Martin AN/AAR-56 Missile Launch Detector
Radar Warning Receiver BAE AN/ALR-96
Communications, Navigation and Identification Suit Lockheed Martin AN/ASQ-244
Stealth Statistic
Radar Absorbing Material Nano Paint
Decreasing Engine Signature Pratty & Whitney will partner with Rolls-Royce in developing a stealthier successor to the existing turbofan engines to minimize detected signature in all possible sensor spectrums.
Geometry Radar deflecting edges and surfaces on B-21 will be experimented on and improved to perform at least 50% better in tests. Additionally, the bomb bay design will be revolutionarily overhauled so that the radar signature and cross-section of the plane does not change when it is opened, due to the doors being internal.

Aesir Block II

[M] Secret to Triumvirate if roll works out.
Following an agreement with the Triumvirate, a Block II of the Aesir combat aircraft will be jointly developed. Rather than dramatically change the aircraft, this upgrade will focus on making the changes required in order to bring the Aesir closer to parity with modern aircraft elsewhere. This will mean three major changes:
  • Introduction of laser countermeasures - the 2 x 6 MW FEL defense system integrated into the F-203 will be fitted onto the Aesir.
  • Stealth-shaped external fuel tanks will be developed to be fitted onto the aircraft, extending range by 1,000 km.
  • The Distributed Aperture System developed in the F-35 and F-203 will be applied to the Aesir, giving the pilot 360 degrees of visibility and targeting. This will be integrated into the existing sensors suite in order to increase the effectiveness of the aircraft.
All in all, applying these changes will cost $6 billion, and take two years. These developments will increase the unit cost by 20%, with the price being 25% of unit cost to retrofit Block I aircraft into the Block II. Additionally, the UK will be able to produce this Block II aircraft, with Swedish equipment in it being produced under license by BAE Systems. Obviously, this aircraft is not for export at this time and required both British and Triumvirate permission for foreign sales.

Hypersonic Cruise Missiles

[M] Secret to USA if roll works out.
Working with the Americans, BAE Systems will further develop and refine existing hypersonic cruise missile technology to create an improved variant with greater operational flexibility. The basis for this project will be the LGM-40A Redcoat, a modern American missile which for some reason has been named after old-timey British soldiers. Improvements will focus on increasing range, stealth profile, and attack speed, while creating a versatile platform that can be fitted onto American and British platforms - while we operate the same surface ships and aircraft, with the F-203, B-27, Bloodhound and Neptune, we operate different submarines and frigates, for instance. This missile will be classified as the LGM-60A Alliance.
This missile will be a bit smarter than its forebear, carrying an onboard computer that utilizes an improved-accuracy version of the previous guidance system, which used and still uses inertial guidance midcourse, with terminal navigation via active radar homing system. The onboard computer will also network with military satellites and aircraft, along with detectors of radar frequencies in anti-missile systems. It will use this combined detection system to gain an awareness of when it's been targeted or is soon to be targeted by a missile defense system.
With the missile gaining that knowledge, we're going to get a bit creative with our warheads as well, to improve lethality in the era of hyperadvanced defense systems. Rather than the single ~500kt nuclear warhead of the LGM-40A, the LGM-60A Alliance missile will utilize a multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle, with seven different smaller warheads, each containing a ~71kt thermonuclear payload, separating in the event that a anti-missile system is detected. If no anti-missile system is detected, the full warhead will remain whole until impact. Development will be three years, at $12 billion, with the greatest part of it being the improved warhead.
Weight - 3,700 kg
Length - 8.6 m
Diameter - 0.8 m
Warhead - MIRV with seven ~71kt thermonuclear warheads, or single ~500kt warhead if no separation occurs
Detonation Mechanism - Airburst or contact explosive
Operational Range - 3,000km
Flight Altitude - Surface-skimming, as low as 2 meters
Speed - Mach 9.5
Guidance System - Inertial for midcourse, terminal navigation via active radar homing system
Accuracy - 0,5m CEP
Launch Platform - Ship, submarine, aircraft and land-based mobile launchers

Maybe not having any missile defence or cybersecurity is a bad idea

[M] Public, not secret at all.
The first of these projects is licensed production of the SAMP/T2-A anti-ballistic missile platform, in the United Kingdom. Working with its Genevois partners, BAE Systems will handle construction of the SAMP/T-2A in the United Kingdom, with manufacturing facilities in Shropshire and Telford being adapted to produce the British version of the platform, to be called the BAE Excalibur in British service, since unlike those sensible continentals we like to give our toys silly fairy tale names.
They'll cost the same as the originals, and we'll do a first order of 80 systems. Considering the expenses of setting up production along with procurement, total cost to the MoD for the missile defense project is $27 billion, with full delivery by January 2058, and payment to BAE spread over six years. Some might think this is a long time to pay, but hey when you're a government, they let you do it.
Additionally, we'll buff up our cybersecurity.
  • Geneva will offer aid in rapidly researching QKD encryption, meaning that in a years' time, it will be a reality across British military and civilian systems. The government has set aside $12,4 billion to fund the integration of QKD into all military communications, along with major financial and commercial systems, and expects this integration to be complete by January 2057. The UK MoD will also work on improving the resistance of QKD systems used in the UK from attacks and disruption that might attempt to compromise the systems, using that same budget set aside for integration.
  • Geneva will provide research assistance for digital "guardians" that help to patrol smart grids, assisting in locating the source of attacks on government and civilian networks.
  • Geneva will openly provide the technology necessary for transactions in the UK to switch over to blockchain banking. With government funding set at $2,4 billion, the financial industry in the UK will undergo a switch to blockchain banking complete with QKD encryption over the next year.
submitted by AJs_WP_Acct to worldpowers [link] [comments]


2017.06.08 14:24 webba84 Some thoughts on a Commonwealth Cruiser Line

Inspired by the really excellent write-ups of possible new ship lines from cwjian90, I thought I’d give it a go myself. I wanted to propose a line that hasn’t been done to death before but that could make a really interesting contribution to the game and being Australian myself I settled pretty quickly on the idea of a Commonwealth Cruiser line.
There were a lot of Commonwealth Dominions that had a navy in some form during the two world wars but the only ones really relevant to scale of the game are the Royal Australian Navy, the Royal Canadian Navy, and the Royal New Zealand Navy, though India deserves a shout out for the sheer volume of their merchant and troop transport shipping.
The British Admiralty was initially less than keen about the idea of Commonwealth Dominions funding and operating their own navies but they relented around 1909 due to the recent increases in German Naval construction and the obvious difficult of protecting such a scattered Empire from strong naval enemies.
The title of ‘Royal Australian Navy’ was granted to the Australian Commonwealth Naval Forces on July 10th, 1911 followed closely by the Naval Services of Canada being granted the title of ‘Royal Canadian Navy’ on August 29th of the same year. The Royal New Zealand Navy didn’t officially come into being until October 1st, 1941 but already had a high degree of self-sufficiency for some time previously as the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy.
For the purpose of including as many real ships in the tree as possible, I am going to count ship that served prior to the granting of the official titles. Even though in most cases this meant that they were technically Royal Navy ships they were increasingly funded, supported, crewed, and commanded by the Commonwealths, therefore I feel they make reasonable candidates for inclusion.
On ship playstyle and ‘national flavour’ we already have HMAS Perth to give a rough indication. Obviously, like that ship, almost all of this line originates in the Royal Navy designs, but in some ways WG has done us a big favour in making the RN cruisers AP only, as it allows us to create more traditional HE+AP versions without them just being clones.
Because the line switches to heavy cruisers at tier 7, and also because I don’t want to add more smoke cruisers to the game, I decided that the line should lack the smoke consumable but retain the heal of the RN cruiser line. In this way, with proper tier-ing, the addition of HE remains balanced, and the uniqueness of the Perth is also preserved. A lot of the ships feature spotter planes, which is quite unique for cruisers and I’ve given them radar from T8 onwards to improve utility.
I conceive of this line as something for experienced players who like a challenge and could adapt to varying ship capabilities and playstyles. This line should only be added to the game after more of the major navies are better represented. Possibly access to the line could be locked behind a certain account level to keep new players away from it until they are ready.
Enough rambling, let’s get into the ships!
Sensible Tier 1 — HMAS Condamine (River class frigate)
The River Class frigates were constructed and operated in large numbers by all three of the commonwealth navies, Canada in particular. In this case Condamine was chosen over the still existing museum ship Diamantina or a Canadian example primarily because it is one of the few versions of the ship that possessed two twin 4-inch gun turrets, which would be required to make it balanced at T1. It definitely doesn’t have anything to do with the fact that Condamine was built in my hometown…
Maximum Speed: 19.5 kts
Displacement: 1,537 tons (standard)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament (not that it matters)
Consumables: Damage Control Party
Inspiring Tier 1 — HMAS Armidale (Bathurst class corvette)
The Bathurst Class corvettes are one of the few ships designed and built by a Commonwealth Nation that could fit into the timeframe and scale of WoWS in any form. Armidale was the only ship of the class lost to enemy action during WWII, sunk by Japanese torpedo planes. After the order to abandon ship was given the wounded Ordinary Seaman Edward Sheean returned to his Oerlikon, shooting down one plane and preventing the rest from making strafing runs on his crewmates in the water. Survivors reported seeing tracers still coming from beneath the surface as the ship went under.
Maximum Speed: 15 kts
Displacement: 660 tons (standard), 1025 tons (full load)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament (still doesn’t matter)
Consumables: Damage Control Party
Notes: Obviously this is massively underpowered even for T1 but the fact that it was an indigenous design, and the heroism displayed during the loss of Armidale, make a compelling case for its inclusion anyway, balance be damned.
Tier 2 — HMAS Encounter A.K.A The Old Bus (Challenger class protected cruiser)
I really wanted to put a Canadian or New Zealand ship here but all of the candidates were either not quite good enough (HMS Philomel) or a bit too good (HMCS Niobe). If someone knows of a good ship for this tier, please let me know, but in the meantime HMAS Encounter will do an excellent job starting the line proper, and is good way to introduce a RN protected cruiser design to the game.
Maximum Speed: 21 kts
Displacement: 5,880 tons (standard)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Consumables: Damage Control Party
Notes: Seems like RN protected cruiser designs were pretty good, shame we don’t have any in game yet.
Tier 3 — HMAS Sydney (Town class light cruiser, Chatham sub-class)
Sydney was of the same base class as the T2 RN cruiser Weymouth, but of the more advanced Chatham subtype featuring improved armour and more advanced guns, though still with submerged torpedoes that won’t show up in game. As a good fit for T3 she’ll be able to sink SMS Emden again, which is all we really want.
Maximum Speed: 25.7 kts
Displacement: 5,400 tons (standard)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Aircraft (after B hull upgrade): Sopwith Pup, Sopwith Camel
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Spotter Plane/Catapult Fighter (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: Apparently Sydney was the first ship in the world to install and use a rotating aircraft catapult, justifying her unique consumables at this tier. The spotter plane in particularly, would be quite useful for getting a bit of extra range out of her guns.
Alternative Tier 3/Premium Tier 3 — HMCS Niobe (Diadem class protected cruiser)
For another tier 3 option we travel to the other side of the world and the first large ship of the newly formed Royal Canadian Navy, HMCS Niobe. Niobe was a protected cruiser of the Diadem class and would sit very comfortably alongside the likes of St. Louis and Bogatyr.
Maximum Speed: 20.5 kts
Displacement: 11,000 tons (standard)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Consumables: Damage Control Party
Notes: It’s been a long time since I played St. Louis but unless I’m missing something this ship might even be slightly better. I prefer Sydney for the line just because that way you get light cruisers continuously from T3-6, but Niobe would make a great reward or gift premium.
Tier 4 — HMS Dunedin (Danae class light cruiser)
Tier 4 was a tricky one because we’re around the interwar period now and the Commonwealth navies basically went into hibernation during that period. However, HMS Dunedin served in the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy from 1924 to 1937 before being replaced by a certain HMS Leander (later HMNZS Leander), and one of New Zealand’s largest cities at the time is also called Dunedin (both named after Edinburgh) so she’s a good option to represent New Zealand here.
Maximum Speed: 29 kts
Displacement: 4,276 tons (standard), 5,603 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: With the addition of HE this ship might be the only one in the whole line that is definitely better than its RN counterpart. Danae is pretty weak though, so I’m fine with that.
Tier 5 — HMNZS Achilles (Leander class light cruiser)
Another New Zealand representative, and a proper RNZN one too. HMNZS Achilles is most famous for participating in the Battle of the River Plate (reenactment coming soon to a tier 5/6 match near you!) and was also the first Royal Navy cruiser fitted with fire control radar. In 1948 she was sold to the Indian Navy and served for another 30 years as INS Delhi.
Maximum Speed: 32.25 kts
Displacement: 7,270 tons (standard), 9,740 tons (full)
Armour (in game same as existing Leander)
Main armament
Secondary armament
Aircraft (after B hull upgrade): Fairey Seafox, Supermarine Walrus
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Spotter Plane/Catapult Fighter (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: A Leander at T5, what madness is this? Well, it is a Leander without smoke or super AP, which does make it much more balanced here. Also, I’m really sick of weak cruisers at T5 and want to put in something that isn’t just automatically Scharnhorst food. In contrast to the RN Leander the B bull upgrade doesn’t massively improve AA but instead allows for the use of catapult aircraft (as was historically the case).
Tier 6 — HMCS Ontario (Minotaur class light cruiser)
No, not that Minotaur class, this is the one that actually existed as a late war update of the Crown Colony (Fiji) cruisers. Compared to the Fiji in game, Ontario has one less turret and is a bit slower, but she has a slightly better armour scheme and better AA.
Maximum Speed: 31.5 kts
Displacement: 8,800 tons (standard), 11,130 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search
Notes: It was quite a toss-up choosing between Ontario and Uganda for this slot, in the end I went with the slightly more unique option. HMNZS Gambia is also a possibility, but her 12 guns would probably be too powerful at this tier.
Premium Tier 6 — HMNZS Black Prince (Dido class light cruiser, group 2)
The Black Prince demands inclusion just on the basis of having an incredibly badass name. 8 x 5.25 inch guns on a Leander hull may not sound particularly scary but they are backed up by excellent torpedoes and enough AA to make even a Saipan think twice.
Maximum Speed: 32.25 kts
Displacement: 5,950 tons (standard), 7,200 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament (original configuration)
Secondary armament (1945-1946)
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Defensive AA Fire
Notes: Should she have smoke of some sort? Nah, CV players will cry enough as it is. Main armament should also be pretty good once buffed with BFT and AFT.
Interlude
Now there is a good light cruiser candidate for T7 in the HMNZS Gambia but it would be very similar to the already existing Fiji and Belfast so for a bit of variety we instead switch the line to heavy cruisers, of which the Royal Australian Navy operated several viable candidates.
Tier 7 — HMAS Canberra (County class heavy cruiser, Kent sub-class)
Canberra was a County class heavy cruiser commissioned into the RAN in 1928. Her 4 x 2 8-inch guns are a decent armament for this tier but she was very lightly armoured even by the standards of the class, having never received the armour upgrades of her Royal Navy sisters, which may go some way to explaining her loss at the Battle of Savo Island. The Baltimore class cruiser USS Canberra was renamed in her honour.
Maximum Speed: 31.5 kts
Displacement: 10,000 tons (standard), 14,150 tons (full)
Armour (probable original configuration)
Armour (semi-historical 1936 refit, after B hull upgrade)
Main armament
Secondary armament (original configuration)
Secondary armament (1942 refit, after C hull upgrade)
Aircraft (after B hull upgrade): Supermarine Seagull, Supermarine Walrus
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Spotter Plane/Catapult Fighter (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: Couldn’t find much information about the armour scheme, but it seems to have been extremely weak, possibly not having any dedication citadel protection at all. Canberra never received the armour upgrade proposed here but during the 1930s the Royal Navy Kent class cruisers did, so it is at least plausible. Aside from that, the upgrades that added aircraft in 1936 and additional AA in 1942 are historically accurate.
Tier 8 — HMAS Shropshire (County class heavy cruiser, London sub-class)
HMS Shropshire was gifted to the RAN in 1943 as a replacement for the recently lost HMAS Canberra. Therefore, her RAN career begins after quite extensive mid-war refits that make her a decent choice for stock tier 8. A semi-historical refit that upgrades AA and sensors while retaining the torpedoes (in reality they were removed in 1945) rounds out the proposal.
Maximum Speed: 32 kts
Displacement: 9,750 tons (standard), 13,115 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament (‘original’ 1943 configuration)
Secondary armament (1945 semi-historical refit, after B hull upgrade)
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Surveillance Radar (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: Radar from T8-T10 is as much for balance as anything else, though it’s just as plausible here as it is on any other ship in the game (cough Missouri cough).
Interlude
I’d be quite happy to finish the line here, as we have pushed things about as far as they will historically go, but since WG have stated they want every line to end at T10, and paper shipping is fun, we’ll go ahead and dive all the way into fantasy land for the last two tiers.
For this we need to almost completely rely on the Royal Navy heavy cruiser design studies of the 1930s and 40s since those designs, if they were built, are the most likely heavy cruisers the Commonwealth navies would operate.
However, there is one heavy cruiser design we can use that didn’t come directly from the Royal Navy. In the mid-1920s the RAN was looking for a replacement for the ageing Melbourne and Sydney Town class cruisers, and a design and cost estimate was submitted by the Cockatoo Island Naval Dockyards#Cockatoo_Island_Dockyard) that was seriously considered. For cost reasons, it was instead decided to purchase two Kent class cruisers constructed in Great Britain (HMAS Canberra was one of these) instead but the design does at least give us a starting point for something unique to this line at tiers 9 and 10.
Tier 9 — HMAS Melbourne (Cockatoo Island Dockyard heavy cruiser design)
The Cockatoo Islands Dockyard design was for a 10,000-ton ‘treaty’ cruiser with 9 x 8-inch guns in 3 triple turrets, a speed of 33 kts, multiple casement secondaries, and submerged torpedo tubes. It was heavily based on the Hawkins class cruiser, as that was what the shipyard had detailed information on, as well as data from Vickers about their planned triple 8-inch turret. Possibly there were also subsequent designs with the secondaries and torpedoes moved to deck mounts, as well as the option for 4 or 3 twin turrets.
To make something viable for T9, I will assume that the design was further developed and updated during the 1920s, constructed in Australia in the 1930s, and further modernized during WWII. She’s named HMAS Melbourne because HMAS Sydney is already in the line and I don’t want to be murdered in my sleep by a disgruntled Victorian.
Maximum Speed: 33 kts
Displacement: estimated 10,000 tons (standard), estimated 15,000 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament (stock)
Main armament (after gun upgrade)
Secondary armament (stock)
Secondary armament (after B hull upgrade)
Aircraft: Supermarine Seagull, Supermarine Walrus (stock only)
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Spotter Plane/Catapult Fighter (stock only), Surveillance Radar (after B hull upgrade)
Notes: Obviously a lot of this is made up, but the BL 8-inch Mark X did exist as a prototype, though it was never put into production.
Tier 10 — HMAS ANZAC (Cockatoo Island Dockyard fictional heavy cruiser design)
So, imagining that the RAN had developed the capability to domestically design and construct heavy cruisers, we can also imagine what they might come up with in the late 1930s as a counter to Japanese designs. Obviously, we can still draw heavily on the Royal Navy wartime cruiser design studies for some of the details. She's named after the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, as a RAN Destroyer was IRL.
Maximum Speed: 33 kts
Displacement: estimated 15,000 tons (standard), estimated 17,500 tons (full)
Armour
Main armament
Secondary armament
Consumables: Damage Control Party, Repair Party, Hydroacoustic Search, Surveillance Radar
Notable Mentions
HMNZS Gambia is the same class as Fiji and would make a solid T7 entry.
HMCS Uganda is also the same class as Fiji, but a later sub-class with one less turret, so would fit well at T6 instead of Ontario or as a premium.
HMAS Australia had a very notable wartime career and would make an excellent T7 or T8 depending on balance. It shares the same name as Australia's only battlecruiser, so if that was included they would have to share names.
Final Thoughts
Well, the line ended up being a lot more Australia focused than I had expected, but they did operate more cruisers than any of the other Commonwealth navies, so it makes sense.
I’d be very interested to play a line like this, I think that generally the ships here would have quite a unique playstyle without overly relying on gimmicks and that the variety and utility of the line would more than make up for the lack of really powerful in-game stats.
Next up I’ll do a Commonwealth Destroyer line, where I suspect Canada will feature a bit more prominently.
P.S. Please feel free to pass this on to the people who develop new lines and ships, Sub_Octavian ;)
submitted by webba84 to WorldOfWarships [link] [comments]


2017.05.04 23:13 FMN2014 Local Election Megathread

It's past 10 PM, so polls have closed and we will begin to get the results of the various local elections across the country.
Sort by new, so you get the most up-to-date information.
The Guardian has an expected timeline of when places will declare their results.
You can follow the results with BritainElects, Election Data, the BBC, the BBC Live Reporting, Sky News or the New Statesment.
You can also follow #le2017 and #LocalElections2017 for more information.
What's up for elections?
The new 6 mayoralties across England:
34 English Councils:
submitted by FMN2014 to ukpolitics [link] [comments]


2017.04.05 15:14 InappropriateSurname Great Gays, Cock-A-Dobby, Chemistry, Boobery, Sunny Blunts and other strange road names

There are just too many great road names to fit into one post. I'm sure in the many close quarters of the UK there's loads of strange roads near you. What does your town, city or county hide away? And is it worthy of sitting in the list below?
Great Gays - Fareham, Hampshire. I'm sure the two people in the picture are thrilled the Google car went past them at that moment.
Water-Ma-Trout - Helston, Cornwall. What you do when your fish is too dry.
Boobery - Sampford Peverell, Devon. Brilliantly, it does have a lovely curve.
Straight Bit - Flackwell Heath, Buckinghamshire. Not actually as straight as the name suggests you lying Wycombites.
Cher - Minehead, Somerset. "Back in a bit darling, I'm just popping up Cher."
Paradise. - Dudley, West Midlands. DUDLEY. Need I say more?
Friendless Lane - Flamstead, Hertfordshire. What a shame! Maybe it could team up with...
All Alone - Bradford, West Yorkshire. "All Alone Road leading to All Alone". The clues are there.
Cock-A-Dobby - Sandhurst, Berkshire. House elves beware.
Football - Yeadon, West Yorkshire. A complete dive.
Minge Lane - Upton upon Severn, Worcestershire. Not a single place to eat out. Disappointing marketing.
Tarmac Road - Wolverhampton. The people building it may have been the same people naming it and they like what they do.
Outpart Eastward - Harwich, Essex. Walk the other way up the street for a thrilling Inpart Westward experience.
Chemistry - Whitchurch, Shropshire. You'll get a reaction from this street.
Nans Kestenen - Helston, Cornwall (again). I don't care what your nan has, she shouldn't be waving it around.
Sunny Blunts - Peterlee, County Durham. You take the high road.
Five Quarters - Radcliffe, Greater Manchester. Maths teachers freaking out all over the northwest.
Bell End - Woolaston, Northamptonshire. One of many prominent Bell Ends up and down the country.
Gibraltar - Kinver, Worcestershire. Maybe this is the one Spain want?
Intended Street - Halesowen, West Midlands. Did the builders not tell the town planners?
Inner Ting Tong - Budleigh Salterton, Devon. Imagine if a sitcom was set here. They'd never let it air.
There are dozens more, but I'll leave you to explore and contribute any. Let's celebrate the weird roads of Britain!
submitted by InappropriateSurname to CasualUK [link] [comments]


2016.08.12 09:25 X_E_N Moving entire rows based on one cells content.

I am hoping for some magic here and I know I might be asking for a lot.
Some kind soul (and my apologies for not remembering who) made a script for me.
To explain its function, I need to explain the data we get at work here.
One huge spreadsheet, with about 7 columns of addresses. In column D it only lists the persons County they are in. Each row with a specific county has to go into a specific tab. Doing this manually is tedious to the extreme.
The data can arrive like this:
Name Address County Username Billing No
John 123 Road Berkshire JDOG1 001
Dave 100 Street OXFORDSHIRE DDogg1 033
Steve Flat 9 STAFFORDSHIRE SDogg 5880
Each county falls under a specific Billing code. so we have 20 tabs for each billing code (not the same as billing no). Any person from a specific county goes into that specific tab.
The code( uses information from a "Locations" tab to know where to put each person. For example (apologies for the long table, I wanted to be thorough):
County Billing Area
BERKSHIRE 11
BERKS 11
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 11
BUCKS 11
HAMPSHIRE 11
HANTS 11
KENT 11
OXFORDSHIRE 11
OXON 11
EAST SUSSEX 11
WEST SUSSEX 11
SUSSEX 11
SURREY 11
ISLE OF WIGHT 11
BIRMINGHAM CONURBATION 11
HEREFORDSHIRE 11
SHROPSHIRE 11
STAFFORDSHIRE 11
WORCESTERSHIRE 11
WEST MIDLANDS 11
WARWICKSHIRE 11
BLAENAU GWENT 160
BRIDGEND 160
CAERPHILLY 160
CARDIFF 160
CARMARTHENSHIRE 160
CEREDIGION 160
CONWY 160
DENBIGHSHIRE 160
CLWYD 160
DYFED 160
FLINTSHIRE 160
GWYNEDD 160
GWENT 160
ISLE OF ANGLESEY 160
MERTHYR TYDFIL 160
MONMOUTHSHIRE 160
NEATH PORT TALBOT 160
NEWPORT 160
PEMBROKESHIRE 160
PEMBROKE 160
POWYS 160
RHONDDA CYNON TAF 160
SWANSEA 160
TORFAEN 160
VALE OF GLAMORGAN 160
SOUTH GLAMORGAN 160
WREXHAM 160
AVON 1
BRISTOL 1
CORNWALL 1
DEVON 1
DORSET 1
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 1
SOMERSET 1
SWINDON, WILTS 1
WILTS 1
WILTSHIRE 1
COUNTY ANTRIM 38
ARMAGH 38
COUNTY DOWN 38
FERMANAGH 38
LONDONDERRY 38
TYRONE 38
CHESHIRE 42
CUMBRIA 42
GREATER MANCHESTER 42
LANCASHIRE 42
MERSEYSIDE 42
ISLE OF MAN 42
COUNTY DURHAM 4
DURHAM 4
NORTHUMBERLAND 4
YORKSHIRE 4
TYNE AND WEAR 4
EAST YORKSHIRE 4
NORTH YORKSHIRE 4
SOUTH YORKS 4
WEST YORKS 4
NORTH YORKS 4
ISLE OF BENBECULA 51
ABERDEEN CITY 51
ABERDEENSHIRE 51
ANGUS 51
ARGYLLSHIRE 51
AYRSHIRE 51
BANFFSHIRE 51
BERWICKSHIRE 51
BUTE 51
CAITHNESS 51
CLACKMANNANSHIRE 51
DUMFRIESSHIRE 51
DUNBARTONSHIRE 51
DUNDEE CITY 51
EAST LOTHIAN 51
EDINBURGH 51
EDINBURGH CITY 51
FIFE 51
GLASGOW CITY 51
INVERNESS-SHIRE 51
KINROSS-SHIRE 51
KINCARDINESHIRE 51
KIRKCUDBRIGHTSHIRE 51
LANARKSHIRE 51
NORTH LANARKSHIRE 51
MIDLOTHIAN 51
MORAY 51
NAIRNSHIRE 51
ORKNEY 51
ORKNEY ISLANDS 51
PEEBLESSHIRE 51
PERTHSHIRE 51
PERTH 51
RENFREWSHIRE 51
ROSS AND CROMARTY 51
ROXBURGHSHIRE 51
SELKIRKSHIRE 51
SUTHERLAND 51
STIRLING 51
STIRLINGSHIRE 51
WEST LOTHIAN 51
WIGTOWNSHIRE 51
ZETLAND 51
BEDFORDSHIRE 7
CAMBRIDGESHIRE 7
CAMBS 7
DERBYSHIRE 7
ESSEX 7
HERTFORDSHIRE 7
HERTS 7
LEICESTERSHIRE 7
LINCOLNSHIRE 7
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 7
NOTTINGHAM 7
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 7
RUTLAND 7
NORFOLK 7
SUFFOLK 7
LONDON London
MIDDLESEX London
The script takes the entire row and copies it to the correct tab, it then highlights any if can't find in the "Locations" tab in red.
The reason I am posting this is I am unsure if the code is good enough, or working right. Sometimes it will flag rows as red, even though there is a location in the list. Ideally I would like the entire row moved to the location rather than copied and hopefully you guys can see if anything is wrong with the code or something missing to make it work better.
I would really appreciate any help on this, I am no where near smart enough to debug this code myself.
Another apology since I am unable to access pastebin at work, I have to dump the code here:
Option Explicit Sub xCode2() Dim shSource As Worksheet Dim shDest As Worksheet Dim strDestSheet As String Dim lRowSource As Long Dim lColSource As Long Dim lRowDest As Long Dim lColTable As Long Dim i As Long, j As Long ' Define the sheet where all rows to be distributed are located. Set shSource = ThisWorkbook.Sheets("Data") With shSource lRowSource = shSource.Cells(.Rows.Count, 1).End(xlUp).Row For i = lRowSource To 2 Step -1 'Debug.Assert .Cells(i, 1).Value <> "NORTH YORKS" strDestSheet = vbNullString On Error Resume Next ' Look in Sheet with table value the string name group for the Country. strDestSheet = WorksheetFunction.VLookup(.Cells(i, 1).Value, Worksheets("Locations").Range("A1:B138"), 2, False) On Error GoTo 0 If Not strDestSheet = vbNullString Then lColSource = .Cells(i, Columns.Count).End(xlToLeft).Column Set shDest = ThisWorkbook.Sheets(strDestSheet) lRowDest = shDest.Cells(shDest.Rows.Count, 1).End(xlUp).Row ' Copy row from Source sheet to destination. shDest.Cells(lRowDest + 1, 1).Resize(, lColSource).Value = shSource.Cells(i, 1).Resize(, lColSource).Value Else .Cells(i, 1).EntireRow.Interior.ColorIndex = 3 End If 'shSource.Cells(i, 1).EntireRow.Delete Next i End With End Sub 
Dropbox file of this here
submitted by X_E_N to excel [link] [comments]


2015.06.13 12:33 formerwomble My week long tour of the South West of the UK (x-post /r/ukbike)

I went on my first cycle trip longer than a day or two round the the south and west of the UK. Probably not the best way to describe it but the best I can come up with.
Imgur album
Strava.
Day 1
Rugby to Cheltenham through the Cotswolds. I thought this was pretty hilly. How wrong I was. The Cotswolds are beautiful.
Day 2
Cheltenham to Bristol. Followed NCN 41 most of the way, mostly flat apart from the climb into Bristol. I am pretty ambivalent towards the NCN networks. I'm glad they exist but more politically they seem to aimed at cycling purely as a leisure activity rather than a mode of transport. I'm sure they're doing their best with what they've got though. Went back and forth over the old Severn Crossing as I wasn't sure if the weather would hold for days 4&5 and wasn't sure when I would get another opportunity.
Day 3
This was meant to be my rest day. That didn't happen. The first half of the day was a lovely mostly flat ride through beautiful Somerset, through hilariously named villages. Like Wookey Hole
Went through Cheddar, and cycled some of the way up the gorge, along to Wells which was a very impressive cathedral. For any Hot Fuzz fans this is where they filmed most of it. Then began the climbing. Unfortunately in this country they love to do temporary road resurfacing with tar and and gravel. For those of you who've never had to cycle on that. Its like riding through treacle. So climbed and climbed until the descent into Bath. Had dinner and a pint with a friend and got the train back to Bristol.
Day 4
The longest and hilliest day. Followed the main road out of bristol, well and truly fed up of convoluted cycle paths, getting lost and constant map checking. So main road it was.
Back over the Severn Bridge again and followed NCN 42 for almost the entire day. First half was rolling up and down hills. It was at this point I decided that downhills were just a lie to make you believe cycling was fun. Before you get kicked in the teeth by the up hills. Probably my lowest point on the ride. Thankfully that was when salvation occurred and I got picked up by a group doing a charity ride following the same route. It was hard keeping up as it was their first day and they were unencumbered by panniers but it's better to keep up than get dropped and go back to solitary plodding.
After lunch there was a straight climb for 15 miles up through the Black Mountains before the plunge into Hay on Wye. Hay is famous for its book shops and they have a literary festival there. I missed it by a few weeks though. This is where I parted ways with the Chepstow to Chester charity riders I'd hoped to stop in Hay but couldn't find any accomo there for cheap enough. So I plodded wearily onwards to a place called Kington on Offa's Dyke which was built in the 8th century as a border between the kingdom of mercia and wales. Stopped in a youth hostel which was over all not that bad and had inside lockable bike storage.
Day 5
The last day, a shorter ride thankfully. Not sure I could have managed much further. Early start from Kington to Ludlow. Which to continue a on a theme was quite an attractive small market town. Then climbed through the shropshire hills before the decent to the rather smaller river severn than the one I'd crossed earlier. Lunch at Iron Bridge before the potter to Telford train station to get home.
Things I have learnt.
That reddit will delete your massive wallotext without provocation or warning. I may rewrite it all again.
That where I am from is very flat and I didn't know the meaning of the word hill.
Because of this having your brakes in tip top condition is very important. With a touring load on your stoppers get quite a work out. I bought new pads before the 3rd day.
Rest, 6 days of fairly long distance cycling will really take it out of you and your legs, an afternoon or a day off would have been a good idea. (On day 0 I did a charity ride)
Nutrition. You really feel it when you forget to eat. Keeping up sufficient water and food intake isn't easy.
Really looking forward to my next tour. This time with more actual sight seeing!
submitted by formerwomble to bicycling [link] [comments]


2015.06.13 12:25 formerwomble My South West UK cycle tour.

I went on my first cycle trip longer than a day or two round the the south and west of the UK. Probably not the best way to describe it but the best I can come up with.
Thanks to everyone here who gave route advice.
Imgur album
Strava.
Day 1
Rugby to Cheltenham through the Cotswolds. I thought this was pretty hilly. How wrong I was. The Cotswolds are beautiful.
Day 2
Cheltenham to Bristol. Followed NCN 41 most of the way, mostly flat apart from the climb into Bristol. I am pretty ambivalent towards the NCN networks. I'm glad they exist but more politically they seem to aimed at cycling purely as a leisure activity rather than a mode of transport. I'm sure they're doing their best with what they've got though. Went back and forth over the old Severn Crossing as I wasn't sure if the weather would hold for days 4&5 and wasn't sure when I would get another opportunity.
Day 3
This was meant to be my rest day. That didn't happen. The first half of the day was a lovely mostly flat ride through beautiful Somerset, through hilariously named villages. Like Wookey Hole
Went through Cheddar, and cycled some of the way up the gorge, along to Wells which was a very impressive cathedral. For any Hot Fuzz fans this is where they filmed most of it. Then began the climbing. Unfortunately in this country they love to do temporary road resurfacing with tar and and gravel. For those of you who've never had to cycle on that. Its like riding through treacle. So climbed and climbed until the descent into Bath. Had dinner and a pint with a friend and got the train back to Bristol.
Day 4
The longest and hilliest day. Followed the main road out of bristol, well and truly fed up of convoluted cycle paths, getting lost and constant map checking. So main road it was.
Back over the Severn Bridge again and followed NCN 42 for almost the entire day. First half was rolling up and down hills. It was at this point I decided that downhills were just a lie to make you believe cycling was fun. Before you get kicked in the teeth by the up hills. Probably my lowest point on the ride. Thankfully that was when salvation occurred and I got picked up by a group doing a charity ride following the same route. It was hard keeping up as it was their first day and they were unencumbered by panniers but it's better to keep up than get dropped and go back to solitary plodding.
After lunch there was a straight climb for 15 miles up through the Black Mountains before the plunge into Hay on Wye. Hay is famous for its books shops and they have a literary festival there. I missed it by a few weeks though. This is where I parted ways with the Chepstow to Chester charity riders I'd hoped to stop in Hay but couldn't find any accomo there for cheap enough. So I plodded wearily onwards to a place called Kington on Offa's Dyke which was built in the 8th century as a border between the kingdom of mercia and wales.
Day 5
The last day, a shorter ride thankfully. Not sure I could have managed much further. Early start from Kington to Ludlow. Which to continue a on a theme was quite an attractive small market town. Then climbed through the shropshire hills before the decent to the rather smaller river severn than the one I'd crossed earlier. Lunch at Iron Bridge before the potter to Telford train station to get home.
Things I have learnt.
That reddit will delete your massive wallotext without provocation or warning. I may rewrite it all again.
That where I am from is very flat and I didn't know the meaning of the word hill.
Because of this having your brakes in tip top condition is very important. With a touring load on your stoppers get quite a work out. I bought new pads before the 3rd day.
Rest, 6 days of fairly long distance cycling will really take it out of you and your legs, an afternoon or a day off would have been a good idea. (On day 0 I did a charity ride)
Nutrition. You really feel it when you forget to eat. Keeping up sufficient water and food intake isn't easy.
Really looking forward to my next tour. This time with more actual sight seeing!
submitted by formerwomble to ukbike [link] [comments]


2015.06.13 12:22 formerwomble One week SW UK cycle tour.

I went on my first cycle trip longer than a day or two round the the south and west of the UK. Probably not the best way to describe it but the best I can come up with.
Imgur album
Strava.
Day 1
Rugby to Cheltenham through the Cotswolds. I thought this was pretty hilly. How wrong I was. The Cotswolds are beautiful.
Day 2
Cheltenham to Bristol. Followed NCN 41 most of the way, mostly flat apart from the climb into Bristol. I am pretty ambivalent towards the NCN networks. I'm glad they exist but more politically they seem to aimed at cycling purely as a leisure activity rather than a mode of transport. I'm sure they're doing their best with what they've got though. Went back and forth over the old Severn Crossing as I wasn't sure if the weather would hold for days 4&5 and wasn't sure when I would get another opportunity.
Day 3
This was meant to be my rest day. That didn't happen. The first half of the day was a lovely mostly flat ride through beautiful Somerset, through hilariously named villages. Like Wookey Hole
Went through Cheddar, and cycled some of the way up the gorge, along to Wells which was a very impressive cathedral. For any Hot Fuzz fans this is where they filmed most of it. Then began the climbing. Unfortunately in this country they love to do temporary road resurfacing with tar and and gravel. For those of you who've never had to cycle on that. Its like riding through treacle. So climbed and climbed until the descent into Bath. Had dinner and a pint with a friend and got the train back to Bristol.
Day 4
The longest and hilliest day. Followed the main road out of bristol, well and truly fed up of convoluted cycle paths, getting lost and constant map checking. So main road it was.
Back over the Severn Bridge again and followed NCN 42 for almost the entire day. First half was rolling up and down hills. It was at this point I decided that downhills were just a lie to make you believe cycling was fun. Before you get kicked in the teeth by the up hills. Probably my lowest point on the ride. Thankfully that was when salvation occurred and I got picked up by a group doing a charity ride following the same route. It was hard keeping up as it was their first day and they were unencumbered by panniers but it's better to keep up than get dropped and go back to solitary plodding.
After lunch there was a straight climb for 15 miles up through the Black Mountains before the plunge into Hay on Wye. Hay is famous for its books shops and they have a literary festival there. I missed it by a few weeks though. This is where I parted ways with the Chepstow to Chester charity riders I'd hoped to stop in Hay but couldn't find any accomo there for cheap enough. So I plodded wearily onwards to a place called Kington on Offa's Dyke which was built in the 8th century as a border between the kingdom of mercia and wales.
Day 5
The last day, a shorter ride thankfully. Not sure I could have managed much further. Early start from Kington to Ludlow. Which to continue a on a theme was quite an attractive small market town. Then climbed through the shropshire hills before the decent to the rather smaller river severn than the one I'd crossed earlier. Lunch at Iron Bridge before the potter to Telford train station to get home.
Things I have learnt.
That reddit will delete your massive wallotext without provocation or warning. I may rewrite it all again.
That where I am from is very flat and I didn't know the meaning of the word hill.
Because of this having your brakes in tip top condition is very important. With a touring load on your stoppers get quite a work out. I bought new pads before the 3rd day.
Rest, 6 days of fairly long distance cycling will really take it out of you and your legs, an afternoon or a day off would have been a good idea. (On day 0 I did a charity ride)
Nutrition. You really feel it when you forget to eat. Keeping up sufficient water and food intake isn't easy.
Really looking forward to my next tour. This time with more actual sight seeing!
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